Microsoft Windows Vista Community Forums - Vistaheads
Recommended Download



Welcome to the Microsoft Windows Vista Community Forums - Vistaheads, YOUR Largest Resource for Windows Vista related information.

You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our free community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so , join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.

Driver Scanner

Vista...? Proceed with caution!

microsoft.public.windows.vista.music pictures video






Speedup My PC
Reply
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
ChrisM
 

Posts: n/a
Vista...? Proceed with caution!

Not sure how much of this is true, but I believe most of it is, and even if
only 1/4 is true, it's enough to make me think twice or even thrice about
going anywhere near Vista for a long time yet...

http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut00...vista_cost.txt

Executive Summary
-----------------

Windows Vista includes an extensive reworking of core OS elements in order
to
provide content protection for so-called "premium content", typically HD
data
from Blu-Ray and HD-DVD sources. Providing this protection incurs
considerable costs in terms of system performance, system stability,
technical
support overhead, and hardware and software cost. These issues affect not
only users of Vista but the entire PC industry, since the effects of the
protection measures extend to cover all hardware and software that will ever
come into contact with Vista, even if it's not used directly with Vista (for
example hardware in a Macintosh computer or on a Linux server). This
document
analyses the cost involved in Vista's content protection, and the collateral
damage that this incurs throughout the computer industry.

Executive Executive Summary
---------------------------

The Vista Content Protection specification could very well constitute the
longest suicide note in history [Note A].



--
Regards,
Chris.
(Remove Elvis's shoes to email me)


Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
ChrisM
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Vista...? Proceed with caution!
In message %23tEkJEBMHHA.5064@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl,
ChrisM <chris_mayersblue@suedeyahoo.com> Proclaimed from the tallest tower:

> Not sure how much of this is true, but I believe most of it is, and
> even if only 1/4 is true, it's enough to make me think twice or even
> thrice about going anywhere near Vista for a long time yet...
>
> http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut00...vista_cost.txt
>
> Executive Summary
> -----------------
>
> Windows Vista includes an extensive reworking of core OS elements in
> order to
> provide content protection for so-called "premium content", typically
> HD data
> from Blu-Ray and HD-DVD sources. Providing this protection incurs
> considerable costs in terms of system performance, system stability,
> technical
> support overhead, and hardware and software cost. These issues
> affect not only users of Vista but the entire PC industry, since the
> effects of the protection measures extend to cover all hardware and
> software that will ever come into contact with Vista, even if it's
> not used directly with Vista (for example hardware in a Macintosh
> computer or on a Linux server). This document
> analyses the cost involved in Vista's content protection, and the
> collateral damage that this incurs throughout the computer industry.
>
> Executive Executive Summary
> ---------------------------
>
> The Vista Content Protection specification could very well constitute
> the longest suicide note in history [Note A].


UPDATE: Sorry, I just realised that this report has already been discussed
in at least one of these groups. Apologies to those who have already seen
it, but ma

--
Regards,
Chris.
(Remove Elvis's shoes to email me)


Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
Peter Foldes
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Vista...? Proceed with caution!
Att: Crossposted


Chris

Old news and was already posted. Also there was no need to crosspost this

--
Peter

Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.

"ChrisM" <chris_mayersblue@suedeyahoo.com> wrote in message news:%23tEkJEBMHHA.5064@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>
> Not sure how much of this is true, but I believe most of it is, and even if
> only 1/4 is true, it's enough to make me think twice or even thrice about
> going anywhere near Vista for a long time yet...
>
> http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut00...vista_cost.txt
>
> Executive Summary
> -----------------
>
> Windows Vista includes an extensive reworking of core OS elements in order
> to
> provide content protection for so-called "premium content", typically HD
> data
> from Blu-Ray and HD-DVD sources. Providing this protection incurs
> considerable costs in terms of system performance, system stability,
> technical
> support overhead, and hardware and software cost. These issues affect not
> only users of Vista but the entire PC industry, since the effects of the
> protection measures extend to cover all hardware and software that will ever
> come into contact with Vista, even if it's not used directly with Vista (for
> example hardware in a Macintosh computer or on a Linux server). This
> document
> analyses the cost involved in Vista's content protection, and the collateral
> damage that this incurs throughout the computer industry.
>
> Executive Executive Summary
> ---------------------------
>
> The Vista Content Protection specification could very well constitute the
> longest suicide note in history [Note A].
>
>
>
> --
> Regards,
> Chris.
> (Remove Elvis's shoes to email me)
>
>

Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
ChrisM
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Vista...? Proceed with caution!
In message O675dMBMHHA.3556@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl,
Peter Foldes <okf22@hotmail.com> Proclaimed from the tallest tower:

> Att: Crossposted
>
>
> Chris
>
> Old news and was already posted. Also there was no need to crosspost
> this


Hi, yes, apologies, I did scan through the postings first and missed the
references to it before. Even so, it might be of interest to anyone that is
new to the group or who missed it first time round.

As far as the cross-posting though, I only posted it to 3 groups, and
believe it is relevant to all three.

--
Regards

Chris.


Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Vista...? Proceed with caution!
Apple also uses DRM in their software, how you think they got Hollywood and
the Music Industry to sell their stuff through through the iTunes Store?
Also, Apple also locks into its own DRM technology for example the
proprietary AAC codec the iPod uses.
--
Andre
Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
My Vista Quickstart Guide:
http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog...3DB!9709.entry
"ChrisM" <chris_mayersblue@suedeyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:%23tEkJEBMHHA.5064@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>
> Not sure how much of this is true, but I believe most of it is, and even
> if only 1/4 is true, it's enough to make me think twice or even thrice
> about going anywhere near Vista for a long time yet...
>
> http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut00...vista_cost.txt
>
> Executive Summary
> -----------------
>
> Windows Vista includes an extensive reworking of core OS elements in order
> to
> provide content protection for so-called "premium content", typically HD
> data
> from Blu-Ray and HD-DVD sources. Providing this protection incurs
> considerable costs in terms of system performance, system stability,
> technical
> support overhead, and hardware and software cost. These issues affect not
> only users of Vista but the entire PC industry, since the effects of the
> protection measures extend to cover all hardware and software that will
> ever
> come into contact with Vista, even if it's not used directly with Vista
> (for
> example hardware in a Macintosh computer or on a Linux server). This
> document
> analyses the cost involved in Vista's content protection, and the
> collateral
> damage that this incurs throughout the computer industry.
>
> Executive Executive Summary
> ---------------------------
>
> The Vista Content Protection specification could very well constitute the
> longest suicide note in history [Note A].
>
>
>
> --
> Regards,
> Chris.
> (Remove Elvis's shoes to email me)
>



Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
Alias
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Vista...? Proceed with caution!
Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin] wrote:
> Apple also uses DRM in their software, how you think they got Hollywood and
> the Music Industry to sell their stuff through through the iTunes Store?
> Also, Apple also locks into its own DRM technology for example the
> proprietary AAC codec the iPod uses.


I guess that leaves Linux.

Alias
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
Troy McClure
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Vista...? Proceed with caution!
not really. doesnt have too much to do with the os. its the file type and
media thats involved



"Alias" <aka@masked&anonymous.es> wrote in message
news:utrOIXBMHHA.1044@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin] wrote:
>> Apple also uses DRM in their software, how you think they got Hollywood
>> and the Music Industry to sell their stuff through through the iTunes
>> Store? Also, Apple also locks into its own DRM technology for example the
>> proprietary AAC codec the iPod uses.

>
> I guess that leaves Linux.
>
> Alias


Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
ChrisM
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Vista...? Proceed with caution!
Hi Andre,

I don't really understand your point. I know that DRM rears its ugly head in
many places these days, and certainly not least Apple and iPod etc. However,
the effects of this are fairly minimal, and can be fairly easily go around
if required (eg by using MP3s and not AAC files, and using AllOfMP3 rather
than iTunes)

What struck me though from that report was the depth and width to which DRM
is imbedded into Vista and the fact that you will be prevented from doing
certain things with DRM protected stuff even if your intentions are pure,
and the amount of extra effort that is going to have to be put into writing
device driver and the amount of system overheads that are going to be
created in an attempt to stop people from copying protected media. All it is
going to do is inconvenience and cost innocent people. Those that want to
make illegal copies are always going to find ways of doing it...

Chris.

In message eaz2ITBMHHA.2232@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl,
Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin] <andred25@hotmail.com> Proclaimed from the tallest
tower:

> Apple also uses DRM in their software, how you think they got
> Hollywood and the Music Industry to sell their stuff through through
> the iTunes Store? Also, Apple also locks into its own DRM technology
> for example the proprietary AAC codec the iPod uses.
>>
>> Not sure how much of this is true, but I believe most of it is, and
>> even if only 1/4 is true, it's enough to make me think twice or even
>> thrice about going anywhere near Vista for a long time yet...
>>
>> http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut00...vista_cost.txt
>>
>> Executive Summary
>> -----------------
>>
>> Windows Vista includes an extensive reworking of core OS elements in
>> order to
>> provide content protection for so-called "premium content",
>> typically HD data
>> from Blu-Ray and HD-DVD sources. Providing this protection incurs
>> considerable costs in terms of system performance, system stability,
>> technical
>> support overhead, and hardware and software cost. These issues
>> affect not only users of Vista but the entire PC industry, since the
>> effects of the protection measures extend to cover all hardware and
>> software that will ever
>> come into contact with Vista, even if it's not used directly with
>> Vista (for
>> example hardware in a Macintosh computer or on a Linux server). This
>> document
>> analyses the cost involved in Vista's content protection, and the
>> collateral
>> damage that this incurs throughout the computer industry.
>>
>> Executive Executive Summary
>> ---------------------------
>>
>> The Vista Content Protection specification could very well
>> constitute the longest suicide note in history [Note A].
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Regards,
>> Chris.
>> (Remove Elvis's shoes to email me)




Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
MICHAEL
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Vista...? Proceed with caution!
Apple might be getting ready to get a good smack down.
Not only do they have some serious accounting/options
irregularities, now this:

Apple Faces Federal Monopoly Suit


by Paul Thurrott, thurrott@windowsitpro.com

Apple Computer finally knows what it's like to be Microsoft: a company that thoroughly
dominates a market, shutting out its competition through artificial links between its products.
Unfortunately, with that kind of success comes increased scrutiny, and thanks to a recent
federal ruling, Apple is about to find itself in court facing illegal monopoly charges.

An intensely private company, Apple currently faces several lawsuits, most of which are in the
process of obtaining class-action status. But only one lawsuit has the potential to harm the
company in a manner similar to Microsoft's epic federal antitrust battle. Last July, a
class-action lawsuit alleged that Apple's decision to tie music sold from its iTunes Store to
its dominant iPod device was illegal, threatened competition, and harmed consumers.

In fact, the charges specifically refer to the Sherman Antitrust Act, which played a prominent
role in Microsoft's United States antitrust trial, and allege that Apple has unlawfully tied
and bundled products, obtained and maintained a monopoly, and attempted to extend that monopoly
into new markets. The charges also extend to various state antitrust laws, such as California's
Cartwright Act.

Apple sought to have the suit thrown out. But in a December 20, 2006, ruling, US District Judge
James Ware denied Apple's request, letting the lawsuit go forward. "Apple has presented no
reason for the Court to dismiss the Cartwright Act claim or the common law monopolization claim
while allowing Plaintiff's federal antitrust claims," the court order reads. "The Court denies
Apple's Motion to Dismiss Plaintiff's anti-trust claims."

The plaintiff's complaint presents a stark look at Apple's strategies in the digital media
market. "Apple deliberately makes digital music purchased at [the iTunes Store] inoperable with
its competitors'

digital music players," the complaint reads. "In order to play music from [the iTunes Store] on
a digital music player, then, a consumer's only option is the iPod. Apple sells the iPod at
prices far exceeding those that would prevail in a competitive marketplace. Apple also makes
the iPod unable to play music sold at its competitors' online music stores. In order to
purchase Online Music to play on an iPod, then, a consumer's only option is [the iTunes
Store]."

The plaintiffs also highlight a dirty secret about the iPod that hasn't gotten much press
outside of WinInfo: The underlying iPod hardware, which PortalPlayer manufactures, natively
supports Microsoft's Windows Media Audio (WMA) format, making the iPod compatible with most
competing online music services. But Apple shuts this compatibility feature off in the iPod
with what Ware calls "crippleware." The order also notes that Apple is using the same strategy
to shut out competition in the nascent video-download market.

According to Judge Ware, the plaintiffs in the case were able to make "sufficient" cause for
their tying and bundling claims. Regarding the monopoly charge, the judge did note that Apple
has a "qualified right"

to refuse to deal with competitors such as Microsoft. However, if that behavior "adversely
affects" consumers, the defendant must justify its behavior. "Accordingly, the Court finds that
Plaintiff has adequately alleged that Apple violated Section 2 of the Sherman Act," the order
reads. Judge Ware also found that the plaintiffs' argument for attempted monopolization was
valid.

The big question, of course, is whether the plaintiffs in this complaint can succeed in court.
Currently, Apple controls about 83 percent of the online music market, 75 percent of the online
video market, more than 90 percent of the hard drive-based MP3 player market, and more than 70
percent of the flash memory-based MP3 player market. Those are heady numbers, similar to those
Microsoft enjoys in the OS market. And certainly, Apple has actively worked to ensure that its
products work only with each other and not with competing solutions. Is that illegal? We might
just get the chance to find out.

More info:

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/01...ntitrust_suit/

http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=4207

http://www.macworld.com/news/2005/01...tery/index.php



"Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]" <andred25@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:eaz2ITBMHHA.2232@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> Apple also uses DRM in their software, how you think they got Hollywood and the Music
> Industry to sell their stuff through through the iTunes Store? Also, Apple also locks into
> its own DRM technology for example the proprietary AAC codec the iPod uses.
> --
> Andre
> Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
> My Vista Quickstart Guide:
> http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog...3DB!9709.entry
> "ChrisM" <chris_mayersblue@suedeyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:%23tEkJEBMHHA.5064@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>>
>> Not sure how much of this is true, but I believe most of it is, and even if only 1/4 is
>> true, it's enough to make me think twice or even thrice about going anywhere near Vista for
>> a long time yet...
>>
>> http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut00...vista_cost.txt
>>
>> Executive Summary
>> -----------------
>>
>> Windows Vista includes an extensive reworking of core OS elements in order to
>> provide content protection for so-called "premium content", typically HD data
>> from Blu-Ray and HD-DVD sources. Providing this protection incurs
>> considerable costs in terms of system performance, system stability, technical
>> support overhead, and hardware and software cost. These issues affect not
>> only users of Vista but the entire PC industry, since the effects of the
>> protection measures extend to cover all hardware and software that will ever
>> come into contact with Vista, even if it's not used directly with Vista (for
>> example hardware in a Macintosh computer or on a Linux server). This document
>> analyses the cost involved in Vista's content protection, and the collateral
>> damage that this incurs throughout the computer industry.
>>
>> Executive Executive Summary
>> ---------------------------
>>
>> The Vista Content Protection specification could very well constitute the
>> longest suicide note in history [Note A].
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Regards,
>> Chris.
>> (Remove Elvis's shoes to email me)
>>

>
>


Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 01-04-2007
Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin]
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Vista...? Proceed with caution!
Its one of major reasons why I think Linux will never have an average grasp
hold on the consumer desktop because it refuses to fully support
proprietary. And with the new version of the GPL coming in March, Linux is
much as doomed for mainstream thanks to Larry Stallman.
--
Andre
Blog: http://adacosta.spaces.live.com
My Vista Quickstart Guide:
http://adacosta.spaces.live.com/blog...3DB!9709.entry
"Alias" <aka@masked&anonymous.es> wrote in message
news:utrOIXBMHHA.1044@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> Andre Da Costa[ActiveWin] wrote:
>> Apple also uses DRM in their software, how you think they got Hollywood
>> and the Music Industry to sell their stuff through through the iTunes
>> Store? Also, Apple also locks into its own DRM technology for example the
>> proprietary AAC codec the iPod uses.

>
> I guess that leaves Linux.
>
> Alias



Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vista just doesn't do it Papa microsoft.public.windows.vista.general 27 03-04-2007 08:42
Is Vista crippled by DRM? Eddie Bauer microsoft.public.windows.vista.general 11 03-03-2007 03:50
Remote Desktop Vista ---X----> Vista. Paul Bubbaski microsoft.public.windows.vista.general 0 03-02-2007 10:27
Vista backup question for MVPs Malcolm H microsoft.public.windows.vista.general 13 03-02-2007 05:36
Re: Vista POP3 Major Problem - Help MS Steve Cochran microsoft.public.windows.vista.mail 11 02-10-2007 02:09




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 00:14.




Driver Scanner - Free Scan Now

Vistaheads.com is part of the Heads Network. See also XPHeads.com , Win7Heads.com and Win8Heads.com.


Design by Vjacheslav Trushkin for phpBBStyles.com.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 RC 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120