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Installing 7 and drive Letters

microsoft.public.windows.vista.installation setup






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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 11-06-2009
Doug
 

Posts: n/a
Installing 7 and drive Letters
I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in 2 .

If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7 DVD
and run setup.

This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently in
both Operating Systems

I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I boot
from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no matter
what drive I choose.

Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be in
sequence.

Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as Vista's
Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check first.

As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:

Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.

I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:

When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot Volume
will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into Vista or
Win 7??

I would also like to give the Drives Names:
Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:

Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:

This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big Vista
C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:

I hope I explained myself??

Thank You in advance

Doug

P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC




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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 11-06-2009
peter
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Installing 7 and drive Letters
Your Talking about a dual boot.
W7 will install onto E but it will write its boot files to C in order to
create the dual boot,
The other thing is that when you start with W7 it will list itself as being
on C
When you start with Vista it will list itself as being on C

peter

--
If you find a posting or message from me offensive,inappropriate
or disruptive,please ignore it.
If you dont know how to ignore a posting complain
to me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate :-)

"Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:#zA71buXKHA.504@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in 2
> .
>
> If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7 DVD
> and run setup.
>
> This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently
> in both Operating Systems
>
> I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I
> boot from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no
> matter what drive I choose.
>
> Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be
> in sequence.
>
> Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as
> Vista's Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check
> first.
>
> As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:
>
> Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.
>
> I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:
>
> When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot
> Volume will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into
> Vista or Win 7??
>
> I would also like to give the Drives Names:
> Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
> Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:
>
> Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
> Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:
>
> This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big
> Vista C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:
>
> I hope I explained myself??
>
> Thank You in advance
>
> Doug
>
> P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC
>
>
>
>

Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 11-06-2009
R. C. White
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Installing 7 and drive Letters
Hi, Doug.

It's good to know that someone is reading my long posts. ;^}

And it sounds like you understand the general scheme of Windows dual-booting
better than most users.

More comments inline...

"Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:#zA71buXKHA.504@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in 2
> .
>
> If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7 DVD
> and run setup.
>
> This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently
> in both Operating Systems


Right! This is how I originally installed Vista into Drive V:, alongside
WinXP, which was already using Drive D:. I long ago adopted the practice of
having nothing in my System Volume except the startup files. All OSes are
installed in my other volumes.

Recognize that your Boot Volume will not always be Drive C:. That is not a
problem at all for Windows. It is a problem only for users who can't shake
off the "Drive C: mindset". Applications will happily install themselves
into X:\Program Files as easily as into C:\Program Files. ;<)

So decide which letters you want to use; boot into Vista and use Disk
Management to create and format the volumes and assign those letters. Then
insert the Win7 DVD and point it to the volume you've chosen.

> I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I
> boot from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no
> matter what drive I choose.


Yes. IF you boot from the DVD. When you boot from the Win7 DVD, it has no
idea what Vista has assigned. If you boot into Vista, then insert the DVD
and run Setup from the Vista desktop, it will see the drive letters that
Vista has assigned and "inherit" those letters. So if you've used Vista to
assign the letter E: to the first partition on your second HDD, you can
point Setup to that partition (watch closely to be sure that you are picking
the right partition on the right disk). When done, Win7's Boot Volume will
be E:, its boot folder will be E:\Windows, and the Start Volume will still
be whatever it was - probably still Drive C:.

> Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be
> in sequence.


Yes. An OS can't have two Drive C:'s. If you want the Start Volume to
remain Drive C:...see previous paragraph.

> Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as
> Vista's Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check
> first.


NO. The fact that the first partition on the first disk is now serving as
both System Volume and Vista's Boot Volume is muddying the waters. And
having that first partition assigned Drive C: is not making the water any
clearer. But that IS the typical arrangement, rooted in computer hard-drive
history and still the default configuration for most new computers with
Windows pre-installed.

Win7's Boot Volume can be in any partition on any HDD in your computer.
Only the Start Volume must be in a specific place. When the computer is
powered on, all it remembers is what was programmed at the factory: Look
for the Active partition on the boot device. Unless the user has changed
the BIOS, that means the first partition on the first HDD - and this
partition becomes the System Volume. The first physical sector on that
partition holds the MBR (Master Boot Record), including the partition table.
Load that and start executing its code - which will find the file bootmgr
(no extension) in the Root of that partition, which will use the BCD (Boot
Configuration Data) in the hidden \Boot folder to select from the existing
Windows installations and jump to the Boot Volume where the chosen version
is installed - which might be any partition on any HDD.

> As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:
>
> Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.
>
> I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:
>
> When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot
> Volume will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into
> Vista or Win 7??


Correct! Boot into Vista, insert the Win7 DVD, and point to "Big Win 7
(E" - also shown as partition 1 on Disk 1 - see my next comment. Setup
will do the rest, including the dual-boot menu that will appear at your next
startup.

> I would also like to give the Drives Names:
> Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
> Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:
>
> Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
> Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:


Subtle correction: As you can see in Disk Management, physical disk
numbering starts with zero; partition numbering starts with one on each
physical disk. So your Big Vista is on Disk 0 Partition 1 and Little Win7
is on Disk 1 Partition 2. Call the physical device a "Disk" to give the
greatly-overused term "drive" a little rest and reduce the confusion just a
little. Disks are NUMBERED; "drives" (which really are "primary partitions"
or "logical drives in the extended partition" or "volumes") are assigned
LETTERS. (Well, usually; drives don't have to have letters. When installed
on a virgin computer, Win7 Setup creates a small separate primary partition
just for the Start Volume and does not assign a letter to it; this makes it
harder for a user to accidentally delete that critical volume or to store
apps or data on it.)

> This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big
> Vista C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:


Right! By George, I think you've got it! Vista will also call it "Big Win
7 (H". And H:\Windows will be your Win7 Boot Folder!

> I hope I explained myself??


Yep!

> Thank You in advance
>
> Doug
>
> P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC


Post back and let us know how this all worked out, Doug.

RC
--
R. C. White, CPA
San Marcos, TX
rc@grandecom.net
Microsoft Windows MVP
Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2009
Doug
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Installing 7 and drive Letters
Reply below:

"R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
news:#MbhO0wXKHA.3676@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Hi, Doug.
>
> It's good to know that someone is reading my long posts. ;^}
>
> And it sounds like you understand the general scheme of Windows
> dual-booting better than most users.
>
> More comments inline...
>
> "Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#zA71buXKHA.504@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>> I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in 2
>> .
>>
>> If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7 DVD
>> and run setup.
>>
>> This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently
>> in both Operating Systems

>
> Right! This is how I originally installed Vista into Drive V:, alongside
> WinXP, which was already using Drive D:. I long ago adopted the practice
> of having nothing in my System Volume except the startup files. All OSes
> are installed in my other volumes.
>
> Recognize that your Boot Volume will not always be Drive C:. That is not
> a problem at all for Windows. It is a problem only for users who can't
> shake off the "Drive C: mindset". Applications will happily install
> themselves into X:\Program Files as easily as into C:\Program Files. ;<)
>
> So decide which letters you want to use; boot into Vista and use Disk
> Management to create and format the volumes and assign those letters.
> Then insert the Win7 DVD and point it to the volume you've chosen.
>
>> I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I
>> boot from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no
>> matter what drive I choose.

>
> Yes. IF you boot from the DVD. When you boot from the Win7 DVD, it has
> no idea what Vista has assigned. If you boot into Vista, then insert the
> DVD and run Setup from the Vista desktop, it will see the drive letters
> that Vista has assigned and "inherit" those letters. So if you've used
> Vista to assign the letter E: to the first partition on your second HDD,
> you can point Setup to that partition (watch closely to be sure that you
> are picking the right partition on the right disk). When done, Win7's
> Boot Volume will be E:, its boot folder will be E:\Windows, and the Start
> Volume will still be whatever it was - probably still Drive C:.
>
>> Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be
>> in sequence.

>
> Yes. An OS can't have two Drive C:'s. If you want the Start Volume to
> remain Drive C:...see previous paragraph.
>
>> Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as
>> Vista's Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check
>> first.

>
> NO. The fact that the first partition on the first disk is now serving as
> both System Volume and Vista's Boot Volume is muddying the waters. And
> having that first partition assigned Drive C: is not making the water any
> clearer. But that IS the typical arrangement, rooted in computer
> hard-drive history and still the default configuration for most new
> computers with Windows pre-installed.
>
> Win7's Boot Volume can be in any partition on any HDD in your computer.
> Only the Start Volume must be in a specific place. When the computer is
> powered on, all it remembers is what was programmed at the factory: Look
> for the Active partition on the boot device. Unless the user has changed
> the BIOS, that means the first partition on the first HDD - and this
> partition becomes the System Volume. The first physical sector on that
> partition holds the MBR (Master Boot Record), including the partition
> table. Load that and start executing its code - which will find the file
> bootmgr (no extension) in the Root of that partition, which will use the
> BCD (Boot Configuration Data) in the hidden \Boot folder to select from
> the existing Windows installations and jump to the Boot Volume where the
> chosen version is installed - which might be any partition on any HDD.
>
>> As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:
>>
>> Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.
>>
>> I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:
>>
>> When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot
>> Volume will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into
>> Vista or Win 7??

>
> Correct! Boot into Vista, insert the Win7 DVD, and point to "Big Win 7
> (E" - also shown as partition 1 on Disk 1 - see my next comment. Setup
> will do the rest, including the dual-boot menu that will appear at your
> next startup.
>
>> I would also like to give the Drives Names:
>> Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
>> Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:
>>
>> Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
>> Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:

>
> Subtle correction: As you can see in Disk Management, physical disk
> numbering starts with zero; partition numbering starts with one on each
> physical disk. So your Big Vista is on Disk 0 Partition 1 and Little Win7
> is on Disk 1 Partition 2. Call the physical device a "Disk" to give the
> greatly-overused term "drive" a little rest and reduce the confusion just
> a little. Disks are NUMBERED; "drives" (which really are "primary
> partitions" or "logical drives in the extended partition" or "volumes")
> are assigned LETTERS. (Well, usually; drives don't have to have letters.
> When installed on a virgin computer, Win7 Setup creates a small separate
> primary partition just for the Start Volume and does not assign a letter
> to it; this makes it harder for a user to accidentally delete that
> critical volume or to store apps or data on it.)
>
>> This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big
>> Vista C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:

>
> Right! By George, I think you've got it! Vista will also call it "Big
> Win 7 (H". And H:\Windows will be your Win7 Boot Folder!
>
>> I hope I explained myself??

>
> Yep!
>
>> Thank You in advance
>>
>> Doug
>>
>> P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC

>
> Post back and let us know how this all worked out, Doug.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@grandecom.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP
> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64



was going to install this evening but something else came up as usual.

I had Win 7 since the second day of release and still have not installed it.

I would like to go with naming the drives and loading 7 from Vista. At least
I will know which drive is which. The other way installing from Win 7 DVD.
Each OS will have same letters for drives, but the drives will not be the
same as the letters??I think

Thanks for all the help.

Will let you know how it works out.

Doug
>

Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2009
mikeyhsd
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Installing 7 and drive Letters
it is very simple to use Computer Management Disk Management to re-label/name the hard drives.

I would boot from the W7 DVD and point the install to your desired drive/partition.

mikeyhsd@lamparty.net



"Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message news:eaZWC4zXKHA.928@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
Reply below:

"R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
news:#MbhO0wXKHA.3676@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Hi, Doug.
>
> It's good to know that someone is reading my long posts. ;^}
>
> And it sounds like you understand the general scheme of Windows
> dual-booting better than most users.
>
> More comments inline...
>
> "Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#zA71buXKHA.504@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>> I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in 2
>> .
>>
>> If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7 DVD
>> and run setup.
>>
>> This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently
>> in both Operating Systems

>
> Right! This is how I originally installed Vista into Drive V:, alongside
> WinXP, which was already using Drive D:. I long ago adopted the practice
> of having nothing in my System Volume except the startup files. All OSes
> are installed in my other volumes.
>
> Recognize that your Boot Volume will not always be Drive C:. That is not
> a problem at all for Windows. It is a problem only for users who can't
> shake off the "Drive C: mindset". Applications will happily install
> themselves into X:\Program Files as easily as into C:\Program Files. ;<)
>
> So decide which letters you want to use; boot into Vista and use Disk
> Management to create and format the volumes and assign those letters.
> Then insert the Win7 DVD and point it to the volume you've chosen.
>
>> I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I
>> boot from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no
>> matter what drive I choose.

>
> Yes. IF you boot from the DVD. When you boot from the Win7 DVD, it has
> no idea what Vista has assigned. If you boot into Vista, then insert the
> DVD and run Setup from the Vista desktop, it will see the drive letters
> that Vista has assigned and "inherit" those letters. So if you've used
> Vista to assign the letter E: to the first partition on your second HDD,
> you can point Setup to that partition (watch closely to be sure that you
> are picking the right partition on the right disk). When done, Win7's
> Boot Volume will be E:, its boot folder will be E:\Windows, and the Start
> Volume will still be whatever it was - probably still Drive C:.
>
>> Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be
>> in sequence.

>
> Yes. An OS can't have two Drive C:'s. If you want the Start Volume to
> remain Drive C:...see previous paragraph.
>
>> Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as
>> Vista's Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check
>> first.

>
> NO. The fact that the first partition on the first disk is now serving as
> both System Volume and Vista's Boot Volume is muddying the waters. And
> having that first partition assigned Drive C: is not making the water any
> clearer. But that IS the typical arrangement, rooted in computer
> hard-drive history and still the default configuration for most new
> computers with Windows pre-installed.
>
> Win7's Boot Volume can be in any partition on any HDD in your computer.
> Only the Start Volume must be in a specific place. When the computer is
> powered on, all it remembers is what was programmed at the factory: Look
> for the Active partition on the boot device. Unless the user has changed
> the BIOS, that means the first partition on the first HDD - and this
> partition becomes the System Volume. The first physical sector on that
> partition holds the MBR (Master Boot Record), including the partition
> table. Load that and start executing its code - which will find the file
> bootmgr (no extension) in the Root of that partition, which will use the
> BCD (Boot Configuration Data) in the hidden \Boot folder to select from
> the existing Windows installations and jump to the Boot Volume where the
> chosen version is installed - which might be any partition on any HDD.
>
>> As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:
>>
>> Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.
>>
>> I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:
>>
>> When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot
>> Volume will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into
>> Vista or Win 7??

>
> Correct! Boot into Vista, insert the Win7 DVD, and point to "Big Win 7
> (E" - also shown as partition 1 on Disk 1 - see my next comment. Setup
> will do the rest, including the dual-boot menu that will appear at your
> next startup.
>
>> I would also like to give the Drives Names:
>> Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
>> Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:
>>
>> Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
>> Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:

>
> Subtle correction: As you can see in Disk Management, physical disk
> numbering starts with zero; partition numbering starts with one on each
> physical disk. So your Big Vista is on Disk 0 Partition 1 and Little Win7
> is on Disk 1 Partition 2. Call the physical device a "Disk" to give the
> greatly-overused term "drive" a little rest and reduce the confusion just
> a little. Disks are NUMBERED; "drives" (which really are "primary
> partitions" or "logical drives in the extended partition" or "volumes")
> are assigned LETTERS. (Well, usually; drives don't have to have letters.
> When installed on a virgin computer, Win7 Setup creates a small separate
> primary partition just for the Start Volume and does not assign a letter
> to it; this makes it harder for a user to accidentally delete that
> critical volume or to store apps or data on it.)
>
>> This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big
>> Vista C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:

>
> Right! By George, I think you've got it! Vista will also call it "Big
> Win 7 (H". And H:\Windows will be your Win7 Boot Folder!
>
>> I hope I explained myself??

>
> Yep!
>
>> Thank You in advance
>>
>> Doug
>>
>> P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC

>
> Post back and let us know how this all worked out, Doug.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@grandecom.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP
> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64



was going to install this evening but something else came up as usual.

I had Win 7 since the second day of release and still have not installed it.

I would like to go with naming the drives and loading 7 from Vista. At least
I will know which drive is which. The other way installing from Win 7 DVD.
Each OS will have same letters for drives, but the drives will not be the
same as the letters??I think

Thanks for all the help.

Will let you know how it works out.

Doug
>

Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2009
Doug
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Installing 7 and drive Letters
RC

I changed the names of the drives and booted from Vista the Win 7 DVD. It
all went smooth. Now Vista and Win 7 both recognize Partition names and
letters as the same.

One question. I know it is the wrong group. I have not installed and dual
booted since XP. I forgot how to change how many seconds you have to select
Vista or Win 7 on Boot .

Thanks Again for the help

Doug

"R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
news:#MbhO0wXKHA.3676@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Hi, Doug.
>
> It's good to know that someone is reading my long posts. ;^}
>
> And it sounds like you understand the general scheme of Windows
> dual-booting better than most users.
>
> More comments inline...
>
> "Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#zA71buXKHA.504@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>> I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in 2
>> .
>>
>> If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7 DVD
>> and run setup.
>>
>> This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently
>> in both Operating Systems

>
> Right! This is how I originally installed Vista into Drive V:, alongside
> WinXP, which was already using Drive D:. I long ago adopted the practice
> of having nothing in my System Volume except the startup files. All OSes
> are installed in my other volumes.
>
> Recognize that your Boot Volume will not always be Drive C:. That is not
> a problem at all for Windows. It is a problem only for users who can't
> shake off the "Drive C: mindset". Applications will happily install
> themselves into X:\Program Files as easily as into C:\Program Files. ;<)
>
> So decide which letters you want to use; boot into Vista and use Disk
> Management to create and format the volumes and assign those letters.
> Then insert the Win7 DVD and point it to the volume you've chosen.
>
>> I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I
>> boot from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no
>> matter what drive I choose.

>
> Yes. IF you boot from the DVD. When you boot from the Win7 DVD, it has
> no idea what Vista has assigned. If you boot into Vista, then insert the
> DVD and run Setup from the Vista desktop, it will see the drive letters
> that Vista has assigned and "inherit" those letters. So if you've used
> Vista to assign the letter E: to the first partition on your second HDD,
> you can point Setup to that partition (watch closely to be sure that you
> are picking the right partition on the right disk). When done, Win7's
> Boot Volume will be E:, its boot folder will be E:\Windows, and the Start
> Volume will still be whatever it was - probably still Drive C:.
>
>> Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be
>> in sequence.

>
> Yes. An OS can't have two Drive C:'s. If you want the Start Volume to
> remain Drive C:...see previous paragraph.
>
>> Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as
>> Vista's Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check
>> first.

>
> NO. The fact that the first partition on the first disk is now serving as
> both System Volume and Vista's Boot Volume is muddying the waters. And
> having that first partition assigned Drive C: is not making the water any
> clearer. But that IS the typical arrangement, rooted in computer
> hard-drive history and still the default configuration for most new
> computers with Windows pre-installed.
>
> Win7's Boot Volume can be in any partition on any HDD in your computer.
> Only the Start Volume must be in a specific place. When the computer is
> powered on, all it remembers is what was programmed at the factory: Look
> for the Active partition on the boot device. Unless the user has changed
> the BIOS, that means the first partition on the first HDD - and this
> partition becomes the System Volume. The first physical sector on that
> partition holds the MBR (Master Boot Record), including the partition
> table. Load that and start executing its code - which will find the file
> bootmgr (no extension) in the Root of that partition, which will use the
> BCD (Boot Configuration Data) in the hidden \Boot folder to select from
> the existing Windows installations and jump to the Boot Volume where the
> chosen version is installed - which might be any partition on any HDD.
>
>> As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:
>>
>> Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.
>>
>> I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:
>>
>> When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot
>> Volume will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into
>> Vista or Win 7??

>
> Correct! Boot into Vista, insert the Win7 DVD, and point to "Big Win 7
> (E" - also shown as partition 1 on Disk 1 - see my next comment. Setup
> will do the rest, including the dual-boot menu that will appear at your
> next startup.
>
>> I would also like to give the Drives Names:
>> Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
>> Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:
>>
>> Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
>> Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:

>
> Subtle correction: As you can see in Disk Management, physical disk
> numbering starts with zero; partition numbering starts with one on each
> physical disk. So your Big Vista is on Disk 0 Partition 1 and Little Win7
> is on Disk 1 Partition 2. Call the physical device a "Disk" to give the
> greatly-overused term "drive" a little rest and reduce the confusion just
> a little. Disks are NUMBERED; "drives" (which really are "primary
> partitions" or "logical drives in the extended partition" or "volumes")
> are assigned LETTERS. (Well, usually; drives don't have to have letters.
> When installed on a virgin computer, Win7 Setup creates a small separate
> primary partition just for the Start Volume and does not assign a letter
> to it; this makes it harder for a user to accidentally delete that
> critical volume or to store apps or data on it.)
>
>> This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big
>> Vista C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:

>
> Right! By George, I think you've got it! Vista will also call it "Big
> Win 7 (H". And H:\Windows will be your Win7 Boot Folder!
>
>> I hope I explained myself??

>
> Yep!
>
>> Thank You in advance
>>
>> Doug
>>
>> P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC

>
> Post back and let us know how this all worked out, Doug.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@grandecom.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP
> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64


Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2009
mikeyhsd
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Installing 7 and drive Letters
WINDOWS KEY + PAUSE/BREAK key
left side Advanced System Settings
Advanced tab at top
Startup/recovery button at bottom.

mikeyhsd@lamparty.net



"Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message news:eiWYlW3XKHA.3612@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
RC

I changed the names of the drives and booted from Vista the Win 7 DVD. It
all went smooth. Now Vista and Win 7 both recognize Partition names and
letters as the same.

One question. I know it is the wrong group. I have not installed and dual
booted since XP. I forgot how to change how many seconds you have to select
Vista or Win 7 on Boot .

Thanks Again for the help

Doug

"R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
news:#MbhO0wXKHA.3676@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Hi, Doug.
>
> It's good to know that someone is reading my long posts. ;^}
>
> And it sounds like you understand the general scheme of Windows
> dual-booting better than most users.
>
> More comments inline...
>
> "Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#zA71buXKHA.504@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>> I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in 2
>> .
>>
>> If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7 DVD
>> and run setup.
>>
>> This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently
>> in both Operating Systems

>
> Right! This is how I originally installed Vista into Drive V:, alongside
> WinXP, which was already using Drive D:. I long ago adopted the practice
> of having nothing in my System Volume except the startup files. All OSes
> are installed in my other volumes.
>
> Recognize that your Boot Volume will not always be Drive C:. That is not
> a problem at all for Windows. It is a problem only for users who can't
> shake off the "Drive C: mindset". Applications will happily install
> themselves into X:\Program Files as easily as into C:\Program Files. ;<)
>
> So decide which letters you want to use; boot into Vista and use Disk
> Management to create and format the volumes and assign those letters.
> Then insert the Win7 DVD and point it to the volume you've chosen.
>
>> I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I
>> boot from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no
>> matter what drive I choose.

>
> Yes. IF you boot from the DVD. When you boot from the Win7 DVD, it has
> no idea what Vista has assigned. If you boot into Vista, then insert the
> DVD and run Setup from the Vista desktop, it will see the drive letters
> that Vista has assigned and "inherit" those letters. So if you've used
> Vista to assign the letter E: to the first partition on your second HDD,
> you can point Setup to that partition (watch closely to be sure that you
> are picking the right partition on the right disk). When done, Win7's
> Boot Volume will be E:, its boot folder will be E:\Windows, and the Start
> Volume will still be whatever it was - probably still Drive C:.
>
>> Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be
>> in sequence.

>
> Yes. An OS can't have two Drive C:'s. If you want the Start Volume to
> remain Drive C:...see previous paragraph.
>
>> Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as
>> Vista's Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check
>> first.

>
> NO. The fact that the first partition on the first disk is now serving as
> both System Volume and Vista's Boot Volume is muddying the waters. And
> having that first partition assigned Drive C: is not making the water any
> clearer. But that IS the typical arrangement, rooted in computer
> hard-drive history and still the default configuration for most new
> computers with Windows pre-installed.
>
> Win7's Boot Volume can be in any partition on any HDD in your computer.
> Only the Start Volume must be in a specific place. When the computer is
> powered on, all it remembers is what was programmed at the factory: Look
> for the Active partition on the boot device. Unless the user has changed
> the BIOS, that means the first partition on the first HDD - and this
> partition becomes the System Volume. The first physical sector on that
> partition holds the MBR (Master Boot Record), including the partition
> table. Load that and start executing its code - which will find the file
> bootmgr (no extension) in the Root of that partition, which will use the
> BCD (Boot Configuration Data) in the hidden \Boot folder to select from
> the existing Windows installations and jump to the Boot Volume where the
> chosen version is installed - which might be any partition on any HDD.
>
>> As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:
>>
>> Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.
>>
>> I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:
>>
>> When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot
>> Volume will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into
>> Vista or Win 7??

>
> Correct! Boot into Vista, insert the Win7 DVD, and point to "Big Win 7
> (E" - also shown as partition 1 on Disk 1 - see my next comment. Setup
> will do the rest, including the dual-boot menu that will appear at your
> next startup.
>
>> I would also like to give the Drives Names:
>> Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
>> Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:
>>
>> Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
>> Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:

>
> Subtle correction: As you can see in Disk Management, physical disk
> numbering starts with zero; partition numbering starts with one on each
> physical disk. So your Big Vista is on Disk 0 Partition 1 and Little Win7
> is on Disk 1 Partition 2. Call the physical device a "Disk" to give the
> greatly-overused term "drive" a little rest and reduce the confusion just
> a little. Disks are NUMBERED; "drives" (which really are "primary
> partitions" or "logical drives in the extended partition" or "volumes")
> are assigned LETTERS. (Well, usually; drives don't have to have letters.
> When installed on a virgin computer, Win7 Setup creates a small separate
> primary partition just for the Start Volume and does not assign a letter
> to it; this makes it harder for a user to accidentally delete that
> critical volume or to store apps or data on it.)
>
>> This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big
>> Vista C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:

>
> Right! By George, I think you've got it! Vista will also call it "Big
> Win 7 (H". And H:\Windows will be your Win7 Boot Folder!
>
>> I hope I explained myself??

>
> Yep!
>
>> Thank You in advance
>>
>> Doug
>>
>> P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC

>
> Post back and let us know how this all worked out, Doug.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@grandecom.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP
> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64


Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2009
Dave
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Installing 7 and drive Letters
In the Start Search box, type msconfig
hit Enter
click on the Boot tab


--
Windows 7 Ultimate
http://get.live.com/wlmail/overview
http://download.live.com/wlmail


"Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:eiWYlW3XKHA.3612@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> RC
>
> I changed the names of the drives and booted from Vista the Win 7 DVD. It
> all went smooth. Now Vista and Win 7 both recognize Partition names and
> letters as the same.
>
> One question. I know it is the wrong group. I have not installed and dual
> booted since XP. I forgot how to change how many seconds you have to
> select Vista or Win 7 on Boot .
>
> Thanks Again for the help
>
> Doug
>
> "R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
> news:#MbhO0wXKHA.3676@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>> Hi, Doug.
>>
>> It's good to know that someone is reading my long posts. ;^}
>>
>> And it sounds like you understand the general scheme of Windows
>> dual-booting better than most users.
>>
>> More comments inline...
>>
>> "Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:#zA71buXKHA.504@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>>> I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in
>>> 2 .
>>>
>>> If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7
>>> DVD and run setup.
>>>
>>> This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently
>>> in both Operating Systems

>>
>> Right! This is how I originally installed Vista into Drive V:, alongside
>> WinXP, which was already using Drive D:. I long ago adopted the practice
>> of having nothing in my System Volume except the startup files. All OSes
>> are installed in my other volumes.
>>
>> Recognize that your Boot Volume will not always be Drive C:. That is not
>> a problem at all for Windows. It is a problem only for users who can't
>> shake off the "Drive C: mindset". Applications will happily install
>> themselves into X:\Program Files as easily as into C:\Program Files. ;<)
>>
>> So decide which letters you want to use; boot into Vista and use Disk
>> Management to create and format the volumes and assign those letters.
>> Then insert the Win7 DVD and point it to the volume you've chosen.
>>
>>> I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I
>>> boot from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no
>>> matter what drive I choose.

>>
>> Yes. IF you boot from the DVD. When you boot from the Win7 DVD, it has
>> no idea what Vista has assigned. If you boot into Vista, then insert the
>> DVD and run Setup from the Vista desktop, it will see the drive letters
>> that Vista has assigned and "inherit" those letters. So if you've used
>> Vista to assign the letter E: to the first partition on your second HDD,
>> you can point Setup to that partition (watch closely to be sure that you
>> are picking the right partition on the right disk). When done, Win7's
>> Boot Volume will be E:, its boot folder will be E:\Windows, and the Start
>> Volume will still be whatever it was - probably still Drive C:.
>>
>>> Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be
>>> in sequence.

>>
>> Yes. An OS can't have two Drive C:'s. If you want the Start Volume to
>> remain Drive C:...see previous paragraph.
>>
>>> Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as
>>> Vista's Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check
>>> first.

>>
>> NO. The fact that the first partition on the first disk is now serving
>> as both System Volume and Vista's Boot Volume is muddying the waters.
>> And having that first partition assigned Drive C: is not making the water
>> any clearer. But that IS the typical arrangement, rooted in computer
>> hard-drive history and still the default configuration for most new
>> computers with Windows pre-installed.
>>
>> Win7's Boot Volume can be in any partition on any HDD in your computer.
>> Only the Start Volume must be in a specific place. When the computer is
>> powered on, all it remembers is what was programmed at the factory: Look
>> for the Active partition on the boot device. Unless the user has changed
>> the BIOS, that means the first partition on the first HDD - and this
>> partition becomes the System Volume. The first physical sector on that
>> partition holds the MBR (Master Boot Record), including the partition
>> table. Load that and start executing its code - which will find the file
>> bootmgr (no extension) in the Root of that partition, which will use the
>> BCD (Boot Configuration Data) in the hidden \Boot folder to select from
>> the existing Windows installations and jump to the Boot Volume where the
>> chosen version is installed - which might be any partition on any HDD.
>>
>>> As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:
>>>
>>> Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.
>>>
>>> I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:
>>>
>>> When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot
>>> Volume will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into
>>> Vista or Win 7??

>>
>> Correct! Boot into Vista, insert the Win7 DVD, and point to "Big Win 7
>> (E" - also shown as partition 1 on Disk 1 - see my next comment. Setup
>> will do the rest, including the dual-boot menu that will appear at your
>> next startup.
>>
>>> I would also like to give the Drives Names:
>>> Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
>>> Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:
>>>
>>> Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
>>> Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:

>>
>> Subtle correction: As you can see in Disk Management, physical disk
>> numbering starts with zero; partition numbering starts with one on each
>> physical disk. So your Big Vista is on Disk 0 Partition 1 and Little
>> Win7 is on Disk 1 Partition 2. Call the physical device a "Disk" to give
>> the greatly-overused term "drive" a little rest and reduce the confusion
>> just a little. Disks are NUMBERED; "drives" (which really are "primary
>> partitions" or "logical drives in the extended partition" or "volumes")
>> are assigned LETTERS. (Well, usually; drives don't have to have letters.
>> When installed on a virgin computer, Win7 Setup creates a small separate
>> primary partition just for the Start Volume and does not assign a letter
>> to it; this makes it harder for a user to accidentally delete that
>> critical volume or to store apps or data on it.)
>>
>>> This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big
>>> Vista C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:

>>
>> Right! By George, I think you've got it! Vista will also call it "Big
>> Win 7 (H". And H:\Windows will be your Win7 Boot Folder!
>>
>>> I hope I explained myself??

>>
>> Yep!
>>
>>> Thank You in advance
>>>
>>> Doug
>>>
>>> P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC

>>
>> Post back and let us know how this all worked out, Doug.
>>
>> RC
>> --
>> R. C. White, CPA
>> San Marcos, TX
>> rc@grandecom.net
>> Microsoft Windows MVP
>> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

>

Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2009
Kerry Brown
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Installing 7 and drive Letters
You can't rely on drive letters being the same in different OS's on
multi-boot systems. The best way is to label the drives as you have
mentioned then don't worry about the drive letters.

--
Kerry Brown
MS-MVP - Windows Desktop Experience: Systems Administration
http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/


"Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:#zA71buXKHA.504@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in 2
> .
>
> If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7 DVD
> and run setup.
>
> This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently
> in both Operating Systems
>
> I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I
> boot from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no
> matter what drive I choose.
>
> Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be
> in sequence.
>
> Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as
> Vista's Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check
> first.
>
> As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:
>
> Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.
>
> I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:
>
> When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot
> Volume will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into
> Vista or Win 7??
>
> I would also like to give the Drives Names:
> Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
> Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:
>
> Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
> Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:
>
> This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big
> Vista C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:
>
> I hope I explained myself??
>
> Thank You in advance
>
> Doug
>
> P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC
>
>
>
>

Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 11-07-2009
Doug
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Installing 7 and drive Letters
Hi Mikeyhsd,

I appreciate the help.The last time I set a machine to dul bootm was about 5 years.I think it use to be done threw a Cmd or registry,If I remember correctly??

That old age catches up rather quickly.\

Peace

Doug
"mikeyhsd" <mikeyhsd@lamparty.net> wrote in message news:e53lLz6XKHA.3696@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
WINDOWS KEY + PAUSE/BREAK key
left side Advanced System Settings
Advanced tab at top
Startup/recovery button at bottom.

mikeyhsd@lamparty.net



"Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message news:eiWYlW3XKHA.3612@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
RC

I changed the names of the drives and booted from Vista the Win 7 DVD. It
all went smooth. Now Vista and Win 7 both recognize Partition names and
letters as the same.

One question. I know it is the wrong group. I have not installed and dual
booted since XP. I forgot how to change how many seconds you have to select
Vista or Win 7 on Boot .

Thanks Again for the help

Doug

"R. C. White" <rc@grandecom.net> wrote in message
news:#MbhO0wXKHA.3676@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
> Hi, Doug.
>
> It's good to know that someone is reading my long posts. ;^}
>
> And it sounds like you understand the general scheme of Windows
> dual-booting better than most users.
>
> More comments inline...
>
> "Doug" <DugGlissremoveme@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:#zA71buXKHA.504@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>> I want to install Windows 7.I have 2 Hard Drives, both are portioned in 2
>> .
>>
>> If I install windows 7 by booting into Vista, inserting the Windows 7 DVD
>> and run setup.
>>
>> This way I can assign drive letters that I will want to use consistently
>> in both Operating Systems

>
> Right! This is how I originally installed Vista into Drive V:, alongside
> WinXP, which was already using Drive D:. I long ago adopted the practice
> of having nothing in my System Volume except the startup files. All OSes
> are installed in my other volumes.
>
> Recognize that your Boot Volume will not always be Drive C:. That is not
> a problem at all for Windows. It is a problem only for users who can't
> shake off the "Drive C: mindset". Applications will happily install
> themselves into X:\Program Files as easily as into C:\Program Files. ;<)
>
> So decide which letters you want to use; boot into Vista and use Disk
> Management to create and format the volumes and assign those letters.
> Then insert the Win7 DVD and point it to the volume you've chosen.
>
>> I am a little bit confused after reading about installing Win 7. If I
>> boot from Win 7 DVD it will assign the letter C: to its Boot Volume, no
>> matter what drive I choose.

>
> Yes. IF you boot from the DVD. When you boot from the Win7 DVD, it has
> no idea what Vista has assigned. If you boot into Vista, then insert the
> DVD and run Setup from the Vista desktop, it will see the drive letters
> that Vista has assigned and "inherit" those letters. So if you've used
> Vista to assign the letter E: to the first partition on your second HDD,
> you can point Setup to that partition (watch closely to be sure that you
> are picking the right partition on the right disk). When done, Win7's
> Boot Volume will be E:, its boot folder will be E:\Windows, and the Start
> Volume will still be whatever it was - probably still Drive C:.
>
>> Then it says to assign D: to the start volume. The other letters will be
>> in sequence.

>
> Yes. An OS can't have two Drive C:'s. If you want the Start Volume to
> remain Drive C:...see previous paragraph.
>
>> Does that mean I need to put Win & Boot Volume on the same drive as
>> Vista's Boot Volume?? I do not think that is the case. I rather check
>> first.

>
> NO. The fact that the first partition on the first disk is now serving as
> both System Volume and Vista's Boot Volume is muddying the waters. And
> having that first partition assigned Drive C: is not making the water any
> clearer. But that IS the typical arrangement, rooted in computer
> hard-drive history and still the default configuration for most new
> computers with Windows pre-installed.
>
> Win7's Boot Volume can be in any partition on any HDD in your computer.
> Only the Start Volume must be in a specific place. When the computer is
> powered on, all it remembers is what was programmed at the factory: Look
> for the Active partition on the boot device. Unless the user has changed
> the BIOS, that means the first partition on the first HDD - and this
> partition becomes the System Volume. The first physical sector on that
> partition holds the MBR (Master Boot Record), including the partition
> table. Load that and start executing its code - which will find the file
> bootmgr (no extension) in the Root of that partition, which will use the
> BCD (Boot Configuration Data) in the hidden \Boot folder to select from
> the existing Windows installations and jump to the Boot Volume where the
> chosen version is installed - which might be any partition on any HDD.
>
>> As of now I have First Drive Portioned in to C: and D:
>>
>> Second Drive Portioned into E: and F:.
>>
>> I want to install Win 7 on the second drive in part ion 1 which is E:
>>
>> When I install from Vista I just have to check E: Drive and the Boot
>> Volume will be on E: too. Hopefully I will have the choice to boot into
>> Vista or Win 7??

>
> Correct! Boot into Vista, insert the Win7 DVD, and point to "Big Win 7
> (E" - also shown as partition 1 on Disk 1 - see my next comment. Setup
> will do the rest, including the dual-boot menu that will appear at your
> next startup.
>
>> I would also like to give the Drives Names:
>> Drive 1 Portion 1 Big Vista - Which is C:
>> Drive 1 Partition 2 Little Vista - Which is D:
>>
>> Drive 2 Partition 1 Big Win 7 - Which is E:
>> Drive 2 Partition 2 Little Win 7 -Which is F:

>
> Subtle correction: As you can see in Disk Management, physical disk
> numbering starts with zero; partition numbering starts with one on each
> physical disk. So your Big Vista is on Disk 0 Partition 1 and Little Win7
> is on Disk 1 Partition 2. Call the physical device a "Disk" to give the
> greatly-overused term "drive" a little rest and reduce the confusion just
> a little. Disks are NUMBERED; "drives" (which really are "primary
> partitions" or "logical drives in the extended partition" or "volumes")
> are assigned LETTERS. (Well, usually; drives don't have to have letters.
> When installed on a virgin computer, Win7 Setup creates a small separate
> primary partition just for the Start Volume and does not assign a letter
> to it; this makes it harder for a user to accidentally delete that
> critical volume or to store apps or data on it.)
>
>> This way I will know exactly which is which, even if Vista calls Big
>> Vista C and Little Vista D: Also if Win 7 calls it Big Win 7 H:

>
> Right! By George, I think you've got it! Vista will also call it "Big
> Win 7 (H". And H:\Windows will be your Win7 Boot Folder!
>
>> I hope I explained myself??

>
> Yep!
>
>> Thank You in advance
>>
>> Doug
>>
>> P.S. I previously read an answer to this from RC

>
> Post back and let us know how this all worked out, Doug.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@grandecom.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP
> Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64


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