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Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"

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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2007
Chad Harris
 

Posts: n/a
Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"
Ed Bott's Microsoft Report

Vista Hands On #4: Clean install with an upgrade key
February 15th, 2007
http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=196#more-196

I've been reading the breathless reports from other websites this week about
the "Vista upgrade loophole." Most of it is typical echo-chamber stuff, and
most of the reports I've read so far have gotten the basic facts wrong. The
Setup feature they're describing isn't a loophole at all. It's a perfectly
legal workaround for an amazingly stupid technical restriction that
Microsoft imposes on upgraders. In this installment of my Vista Hands On
series, I provide the background to help you understand exactly what's going
on and how you can legally perform a clean install using an upgrade key.

Let's start with a few essential facts:

All retail copies of Windows Vista use the exact same media. The DVD
contains all editions and can be used to perform a full installation or an
upgrade. If you compare a full retail copy of Windows Vista Ultimate and an
upgrade copy of Windows Vista Home Basic, you'll find that the installation
media for the two products are virtually identical.
The product key included with the copy you purchase determines how the Setup
program behaves. These behaviors are hard-coded into the Setup program based
on the key you enter. Specifically, the Setup program is able to look at
your key and use an algorithm to determine the edition it "unlocks." The
same algorithm determines whether you are allowed to use that key for an
upgrade or a clean install or both.
The license agreement for a Vista upgrade copy requires that the machine
already be licensed for Windows. This license agreement does not restrict
the method of installation in any way. Section 13 of the agreement reads as
follows:
UPGRADES. To use upgrade software, you must first be licensed for the
software that is eligible for the upgrade. Upon upgrade, this agreement
takes the place of the agreement for the software you upgraded from. After
you upgrade, you may no longer use the software you upgraded from.
When you run Setup with an upgrade key, the installer does not check to see
whether you're really eligible. In fact, Microsoft's licensing
infrastructure - the activation and validation servers it uses to check
product keys against hardware hashes - does not (yet) contain any mechanism
to match up your upgrade license with a previous license.
To use an upgrade product key, you must start the Vista Setup program from
Windows 2000, Windows XP, or any edition of Windows Vista. Your previous
version of Windows doesn't have to be activated. Even an evaluation copy of
the edition of Windows Vista you purchased will allow you to run the Setup
program with an upgrade key. (Remember that last part.)
Got all that? Good. Now let's put the pieces together.


I'm going to assume that you have a PC that came with Windows XP
preinstalled by the PC maker. Any OEM version of Windows XP is eligible to
upgrade to any edition of Windows Vista. So you purchase a retail upgrade
copy of Vista Ultimate. In the box is a DVD and a 25-character product key.

You don't want to do what Microsoft calls an in-place upgrade, which
preserves your installed programs and data files but has a greater risk of
migrating your problems as well. Instead, you want to do a clean install.
But there's a problem: Microsoft used a crude technique to make clean
installs more difficult for upgraders. If you boot from the Vista DVD and
enter an upgrade key, you'll see this error message and will not be able to
go any further:



Now, this restriction is stupid, because even Microsoft acknowledges that
you can be legally entitled to purchase the upgrade version and yet have to
do a clean install. (See the notes on Microsoft's official Windows Vista
Upgrade Paths from Previous Versions page, for example, which says: "If you
are currently using Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP Professional
x64, you are eligible for an upgrade copy to a corresponding or better
edition of Windows Vista, but a clean install is required." Ahem.)

This silly technical restriction is not required by the license agreement.
It's designed to frustrate anyone who wants to use the upgrade version on a
new PC without an operating system and get them to pay more for a full
version. But it's easily worked around.

Your easiest option - by far - is to use the PC maker's system recovery
media to restore an image of Windows XP as it existed when you first got the
computer, and then install Vista. I can hear the complaints now: "That copy
is out of date. It's loaded with crummy, obsolete drivers and crapware."
Yes, I know. That doesn't matter. Every bit of that junk will be erased soon
enough. It will never get mixed with your new Vista setup.

After you finish restoring that original system image, start Windows, insert
the Vista DVD, and run Vista's Setup program. Follow the steps I listed in
Vista Hands On #2: A no-fuss, nondestructive clean install, this time using
your upgrade product key. When you're done, use the Disk Cleanup tool to
remove all traces of your old installation. You have a fresh, clean system
and you are in perfect compliance with your license agreement.

What if you don't have a restore CD? In that case, you can install an
evaluation copy of Windows Vista on the system, specifically to allow you to
run Setup. Here's how:

1. Boot from the DVD and click Install Now.

2. Leave the product key box blank. Instead, click Next.

3. Click No in this warning dialog box.



4. From the list of Vista editions, choose the one that matches the upgrade
you purchased.



5. Complete the installation, accepting all defaults.

Do whatever minimal steps are required to start your new installation for
the first time. Wouldn't it be nice if you could enter your perfectly legal,
fully paid-for product key now and just make the installation complete?
Sorry, you can't do that.

Instead, you need to run Setup again, this time from within Windows Vista.
Don't choose the Upgrade option unless you want to spend an hour or two
migrating your nonpersonalized default Vista settings. Instead, do a
nondestructive clean install. When that's done (it should go very quickly),
use the Disk Cleanup tool to blow away the redundant installation in
Windows.old. You're now good to go.

Now, was that a loophole? No. You satisfied every condition of the license
agreement and aren't skating by on a technicality. The fact that you have to
use a kludgey workaround to use the license you've purchased and are legally
entitled to is Microsoft's fault.


Reply With Quote
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2007
Bill Condie
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"
Yeah for Ed!

"Chad Harris" <vistaneedsmuchowork.net> wrote in message
news:%23AZzVS3UHHA.4028@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> Ed Bott's Microsoft Report
>
> Vista Hands On #4: Clean install with an upgrade key
> February 15th, 2007
> http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=196#more-196
>
> I've been reading the breathless reports from other websites this week
> about the "Vista upgrade loophole." Most of it is typical echo-chamber
> stuff, and most of the reports I've read so far have gotten the basic
> facts wrong. The Setup feature they're describing isn't a loophole at all.
> It's a perfectly legal workaround for an amazingly stupid technical
> restriction that Microsoft imposes on upgraders. In this installment of my
> Vista Hands On series, I provide the background to help you understand
> exactly what's going on and how you can legally perform a clean install
> using an upgrade key.
>
> Let's start with a few essential facts:
>
> All retail copies of Windows Vista use the exact same media. The DVD
> contains all editions and can be used to perform a full installation or an
> upgrade. If you compare a full retail copy of Windows Vista Ultimate and
> an upgrade copy of Windows Vista Home Basic, you'll find that the
> installation media for the two products are virtually identical.
> The product key included with the copy you purchase determines how the
> Setup program behaves. These behaviors are hard-coded into the Setup
> program based on the key you enter. Specifically, the Setup program is
> able to look at your key and use an algorithm to determine the edition it
> "unlocks." The same algorithm determines whether you are allowed to use
> that key for an upgrade or a clean install or both.
> The license agreement for a Vista upgrade copy requires that the machine
> already be licensed for Windows. This license agreement does not restrict
> the method of installation in any way. Section 13 of the agreement reads
> as follows:
> UPGRADES. To use upgrade software, you must first be licensed for the
> software that is eligible for the upgrade. Upon upgrade, this agreement
> takes the place of the agreement for the software you upgraded from. After
> you upgrade, you may no longer use the software you upgraded from.
> When you run Setup with an upgrade key, the installer does not check to
> see whether you're really eligible. In fact, Microsoft's licensing
> infrastructure - the activation and validation servers it uses to check
> product keys against hardware hashes - does not (yet) contain any
> mechanism to match up your upgrade license with a previous license.
> To use an upgrade product key, you must start the Vista Setup program from
> Windows 2000, Windows XP, or any edition of Windows Vista. Your previous
> version of Windows doesn't have to be activated. Even an evaluation copy
> of the edition of Windows Vista you purchased will allow you to run the
> Setup program with an upgrade key. (Remember that last part.)
> Got all that? Good. Now let's put the pieces together.
>
>
> I'm going to assume that you have a PC that came with Windows XP
> preinstalled by the PC maker. Any OEM version of Windows XP is eligible to
> upgrade to any edition of Windows Vista. So you purchase a retail upgrade
> copy of Vista Ultimate. In the box is a DVD and a 25-character product
> key.
>
> You don't want to do what Microsoft calls an in-place upgrade, which
> preserves your installed programs and data files but has a greater risk of
> migrating your problems as well. Instead, you want to do a clean install.
> But there's a problem: Microsoft used a crude technique to make clean
> installs more difficult for upgraders. If you boot from the Vista DVD and
> enter an upgrade key, you'll see this error message and will not be able
> to go any further:
>
>
>
> Now, this restriction is stupid, because even Microsoft acknowledges that
> you can be legally entitled to purchase the upgrade version and yet have
> to do a clean install. (See the notes on Microsoft's official Windows
> Vista Upgrade Paths from Previous Versions page, for example, which says:
> "If you are currently using Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP
> Professional x64, you are eligible for an upgrade copy to a corresponding
> or better edition of Windows Vista, but a clean install is required."
> Ahem.)
>
> This silly technical restriction is not required by the license agreement.
> It's designed to frustrate anyone who wants to use the upgrade version on
> a new PC without an operating system and get them to pay more for a full
> version. But it's easily worked around.
>
> Your easiest option - by far - is to use the PC maker's system recovery
> media to restore an image of Windows XP as it existed when you first got
> the computer, and then install Vista. I can hear the complaints now: "That
> copy is out of date. It's loaded with crummy, obsolete drivers and
> crapware." Yes, I know. That doesn't matter. Every bit of that junk will
> be erased soon enough. It will never get mixed with your new Vista setup.
>
> After you finish restoring that original system image, start Windows,
> insert the Vista DVD, and run Vista's Setup program. Follow the steps I
> listed in Vista Hands On #2: A no-fuss, nondestructive clean install, this
> time using your upgrade product key. When you're done, use the Disk
> Cleanup tool to remove all traces of your old installation. You have a
> fresh, clean system and you are in perfect compliance with your license
> agreement.
>
> What if you don't have a restore CD? In that case, you can install an
> evaluation copy of Windows Vista on the system, specifically to allow you
> to run Setup. Here's how:
>
> 1. Boot from the DVD and click Install Now.
>
> 2. Leave the product key box blank. Instead, click Next.
>
> 3. Click No in this warning dialog box.
>
>
>
> 4. From the list of Vista editions, choose the one that matches the
> upgrade you purchased.
>
>
>
> 5. Complete the installation, accepting all defaults.
>
> Do whatever minimal steps are required to start your new installation for
> the first time. Wouldn't it be nice if you could enter your perfectly
> legal, fully paid-for product key now and just make the installation
> complete? Sorry, you can't do that.
>
> Instead, you need to run Setup again, this time from within Windows Vista.
> Don't choose the Upgrade option unless you want to spend an hour or two
> migrating your nonpersonalized default Vista settings. Instead, do a
> nondestructive clean install. When that's done (it should go very
> quickly), use the Disk Cleanup tool to blow away the redundant
> installation in Windows.old. You're now good to go.
>
> Now, was that a loophole? No. You satisfied every condition of the license
> agreement and aren't skating by on a technicality. The fact that you have
> to use a kludgey workaround to use the license you've purchased and are
> legally entitled to is Microsoft's fault.
>
>


Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2007
Diamontina Cocktail
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"
It basically sounds like "install XP or W2K and then load the Vista DVD and
tell it to clean install from there". Wasnt that always obvious? I remember
many of my colleagues installing WIN95 so they could install the 98SE
upgrade, not realising they could install the 98SE upgrade fresh from the CD
without installing WIN95. So it is actually something we should already be
used to seeing.

"Bill Condie" <billcondie@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:emn7fY3UHHA.4404@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
> Yeah for Ed!
>
> "Chad Harris" <vistaneedsmuchowork.net> wrote in message
> news:%23AZzVS3UHHA.4028@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> Ed Bott's Microsoft Report
>>
>> Vista Hands On #4: Clean install with an upgrade key
>> February 15th, 2007
>> http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=196#more-196
>>
>> I've been reading the breathless reports from other websites this week
>> about the "Vista upgrade loophole." Most of it is typical echo-chamber
>> stuff, and most of the reports I've read so far have gotten the basic
>> facts wrong. The Setup feature they're describing isn't a loophole at
>> all. It's a perfectly legal workaround for an amazingly stupid technical
>> restriction that Microsoft imposes on upgraders. In this installment of
>> my Vista Hands On series, I provide the background to help you understand
>> exactly what's going on and how you can legally perform a clean install
>> using an upgrade key.
>>
>> Let's start with a few essential facts:
>>
>> All retail copies of Windows Vista use the exact same media. The DVD
>> contains all editions and can be used to perform a full installation or
>> an upgrade. If you compare a full retail copy of Windows Vista Ultimate
>> and an upgrade copy of Windows Vista Home Basic, you'll find that the
>> installation media for the two products are virtually identical.
>> The product key included with the copy you purchase determines how the
>> Setup program behaves. These behaviors are hard-coded into the Setup
>> program based on the key you enter. Specifically, the Setup program is
>> able to look at your key and use an algorithm to determine the edition it
>> "unlocks." The same algorithm determines whether you are allowed to use
>> that key for an upgrade or a clean install or both.
>> The license agreement for a Vista upgrade copy requires that the machine
>> already be licensed for Windows. This license agreement does not restrict
>> the method of installation in any way. Section 13 of the agreement reads
>> as follows:
>> UPGRADES. To use upgrade software, you must first be licensed for the
>> software that is eligible for the upgrade. Upon upgrade, this agreement
>> takes the place of the agreement for the software you upgraded from.
>> After you upgrade, you may no longer use the software you upgraded from.
>> When you run Setup with an upgrade key, the installer does not check to
>> see whether you're really eligible. In fact, Microsoft's licensing
>> infrastructure - the activation and validation servers it uses to check
>> product keys against hardware hashes - does not (yet) contain any
>> mechanism to match up your upgrade license with a previous license.
>> To use an upgrade product key, you must start the Vista Setup program
>> from Windows 2000, Windows XP, or any edition of Windows Vista. Your
>> previous version of Windows doesn't have to be activated. Even an
>> evaluation copy of the edition of Windows Vista you purchased will allow
>> you to run the Setup program with an upgrade key. (Remember that last
>> part.)
>> Got all that? Good. Now let's put the pieces together.
>>
>>
>> I'm going to assume that you have a PC that came with Windows XP
>> preinstalled by the PC maker. Any OEM version of Windows XP is eligible
>> to upgrade to any edition of Windows Vista. So you purchase a retail
>> upgrade copy of Vista Ultimate. In the box is a DVD and a 25-character
>> product key.
>>
>> You don't want to do what Microsoft calls an in-place upgrade, which
>> preserves your installed programs and data files but has a greater risk
>> of migrating your problems as well. Instead, you want to do a clean
>> install. But there's a problem: Microsoft used a crude technique to make
>> clean installs more difficult for upgraders. If you boot from the Vista
>> DVD and enter an upgrade key, you'll see this error message and will not
>> be able to go any further:
>>
>>
>>
>> Now, this restriction is stupid, because even Microsoft acknowledges that
>> you can be legally entitled to purchase the upgrade version and yet have
>> to do a clean install. (See the notes on Microsoft's official Windows
>> Vista Upgrade Paths from Previous Versions page, for example, which says:
>> "If you are currently using Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP
>> Professional x64, you are eligible for an upgrade copy to a corresponding
>> or better edition of Windows Vista, but a clean install is required."
>> Ahem.)
>>
>> This silly technical restriction is not required by the license
>> agreement. It's designed to frustrate anyone who wants to use the upgrade
>> version on a new PC without an operating system and get them to pay more
>> for a full version. But it's easily worked around.
>>
>> Your easiest option - by far - is to use the PC maker's system recovery
>> media to restore an image of Windows XP as it existed when you first got
>> the computer, and then install Vista. I can hear the complaints now:
>> "That copy is out of date. It's loaded with crummy, obsolete drivers and
>> crapware." Yes, I know. That doesn't matter. Every bit of that junk will
>> be erased soon enough. It will never get mixed with your new Vista setup.
>>
>> After you finish restoring that original system image, start Windows,
>> insert the Vista DVD, and run Vista's Setup program. Follow the steps I
>> listed in Vista Hands On #2: A no-fuss, nondestructive clean install,
>> this time using your upgrade product key. When you're done, use the Disk
>> Cleanup tool to remove all traces of your old installation. You have a
>> fresh, clean system and you are in perfect compliance with your license
>> agreement.
>>
>> What if you don't have a restore CD? In that case, you can install an
>> evaluation copy of Windows Vista on the system, specifically to allow you
>> to run Setup. Here's how:
>>
>> 1. Boot from the DVD and click Install Now.
>>
>> 2. Leave the product key box blank. Instead, click Next.
>>
>> 3. Click No in this warning dialog box.
>>
>>
>>
>> 4. From the list of Vista editions, choose the one that matches the
>> upgrade you purchased.
>>
>>
>>
>> 5. Complete the installation, accepting all defaults.
>>
>> Do whatever minimal steps are required to start your new installation for
>> the first time. Wouldn't it be nice if you could enter your perfectly
>> legal, fully paid-for product key now and just make the installation
>> complete? Sorry, you can't do that.
>>
>> Instead, you need to run Setup again, this time from within Windows
>> Vista. Don't choose the Upgrade option unless you want to spend an hour
>> or two migrating your nonpersonalized default Vista settings. Instead, do
>> a nondestructive clean install. When that's done (it should go very
>> quickly), use the Disk Cleanup tool to blow away the redundant
>> installation in Windows.old. You're now good to go.
>>
>> Now, was that a loophole? No. You satisfied every condition of the
>> license agreement and aren't skating by on a technicality. The fact that
>> you have to use a kludgey workaround to use the license you've purchased
>> and are legally entitled to is Microsoft's fault.
>>
>>

>


Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2007
Chris
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"
Diamontina Cocktail wrote:
> It basically sounds like "install XP or W2K and then load the Vista DVD
> and tell it to clean install from there". Wasnt that always obvious? I
> remember many of my colleagues installing WIN95 so they could install
> the 98SE upgrade, not realising they could install the 98SE upgrade
> fresh from the CD without installing WIN95. So it is actually something
> we should already be used to seeing.
>
> "Bill Condie" <billcondie@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:emn7fY3UHHA.4404@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>> Yeah for Ed!
>>
>> "Chad Harris" <vistaneedsmuchowork.net> wrote in message
>> news:%23AZzVS3UHHA.4028@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> Ed Bott's Microsoft Report
>>>
>>> Vista Hands On #4: Clean install with an upgrade key
>>> February 15th, 2007
>>> http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=196#more-196
>>>
>>> I've been reading the breathless reports from other websites this
>>> week about the "Vista upgrade loophole." Most of it is typical
>>> echo-chamber stuff, and most of the reports I've read so far have
>>> gotten the basic facts wrong. The Setup feature they're describing
>>> isn't a loophole at all. It's a perfectly legal workaround for an
>>> amazingly stupid technical restriction that Microsoft imposes on
>>> upgraders. In this installment of my Vista Hands On series, I provide
>>> the background to help you understand exactly what's going on and how
>>> you can legally perform a clean install using an upgrade key.
>>>
>>> [SNIP]
>>>
>>> 1. Boot from the DVD and click Install Now.
>>>
>>> 2. Leave the product key box blank. Instead, click Next.
>>> [SNIP]
>>> ....
>>> etc

>


I wonder what Mr. Bott thinks the difference is between a loophole and a
legal workaround? Anyway, he is basically describing what Paul
Thurrott, and others, already reported about, but adding a snarky
opening paragraph griping about how others reported this issue.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2007
Dale
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"
I'd still like to hear what Microsoft says about that; whether they call it
a blunder or intentional.

Dale

"Diamontina Cocktail" <lrb@australia.com> wrote in message
news:%23FWgH%235UHHA.5108@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> It basically sounds like "install XP or W2K and then load the Vista DVD
> and tell it to clean install from there". Wasnt that always obvious? I
> remember many of my colleagues installing WIN95 so they could install the
> 98SE upgrade, not realising they could install the 98SE upgrade fresh from
> the CD without installing WIN95. So it is actually something we should
> already be used to seeing.
>
> "Bill Condie" <billcondie@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:emn7fY3UHHA.4404@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>> Yeah for Ed!
>>
>> "Chad Harris" <vistaneedsmuchowork.net> wrote in message
>> news:%23AZzVS3UHHA.4028@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> Ed Bott's Microsoft Report
>>>
>>> Vista Hands On #4: Clean install with an upgrade key
>>> February 15th, 2007
>>> http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=196#more-196
>>>
>>> I've been reading the breathless reports from other websites this week
>>> about the "Vista upgrade loophole." Most of it is typical echo-chamber
>>> stuff, and most of the reports I've read so far have gotten the basic
>>> facts wrong. The Setup feature they're describing isn't a loophole at
>>> all. It's a perfectly legal workaround for an amazingly stupid technical
>>> restriction that Microsoft imposes on upgraders. In this installment of
>>> my Vista Hands On series, I provide the background to help you
>>> understand exactly what's going on and how you can legally perform a
>>> clean install using an upgrade key.
>>>
>>> Let's start with a few essential facts:
>>>
>>> All retail copies of Windows Vista use the exact same media. The DVD
>>> contains all editions and can be used to perform a full installation or
>>> an upgrade. If you compare a full retail copy of Windows Vista Ultimate
>>> and an upgrade copy of Windows Vista Home Basic, you'll find that the
>>> installation media for the two products are virtually identical.
>>> The product key included with the copy you purchase determines how the
>>> Setup program behaves. These behaviors are hard-coded into the Setup
>>> program based on the key you enter. Specifically, the Setup program is
>>> able to look at your key and use an algorithm to determine the edition
>>> it "unlocks." The same algorithm determines whether you are allowed to
>>> use that key for an upgrade or a clean install or both.
>>> The license agreement for a Vista upgrade copy requires that the machine
>>> already be licensed for Windows. This license agreement does not
>>> restrict the method of installation in any way. Section 13 of the
>>> agreement reads as follows:
>>> UPGRADES. To use upgrade software, you must first be licensed for the
>>> software that is eligible for the upgrade. Upon upgrade, this agreement
>>> takes the place of the agreement for the software you upgraded from.
>>> After you upgrade, you may no longer use the software you upgraded from.
>>> When you run Setup with an upgrade key, the installer does not check to
>>> see whether you're really eligible. In fact, Microsoft's licensing
>>> infrastructure - the activation and validation servers it uses to check
>>> product keys against hardware hashes - does not (yet) contain any
>>> mechanism to match up your upgrade license with a previous license.
>>> To use an upgrade product key, you must start the Vista Setup program
>>> from Windows 2000, Windows XP, or any edition of Windows Vista. Your
>>> previous version of Windows doesn't have to be activated. Even an
>>> evaluation copy of the edition of Windows Vista you purchased will allow
>>> you to run the Setup program with an upgrade key. (Remember that last
>>> part.)
>>> Got all that? Good. Now let's put the pieces together.
>>>
>>>
>>> I'm going to assume that you have a PC that came with Windows XP
>>> preinstalled by the PC maker. Any OEM version of Windows XP is eligible
>>> to upgrade to any edition of Windows Vista. So you purchase a retail
>>> upgrade copy of Vista Ultimate. In the box is a DVD and a 25-character
>>> product key.
>>>
>>> You don't want to do what Microsoft calls an in-place upgrade, which
>>> preserves your installed programs and data files but has a greater risk
>>> of migrating your problems as well. Instead, you want to do a clean
>>> install. But there's a problem: Microsoft used a crude technique to make
>>> clean installs more difficult for upgraders. If you boot from the Vista
>>> DVD and enter an upgrade key, you'll see this error message and will not
>>> be able to go any further:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Now, this restriction is stupid, because even Microsoft acknowledges
>>> that you can be legally entitled to purchase the upgrade version and yet
>>> have to do a clean install. (See the notes on Microsoft's official
>>> Windows Vista Upgrade Paths from Previous Versions page, for example,
>>> which says: "If you are currently using Windows 2000 Professional or
>>> Windows XP Professional x64, you are eligible for an upgrade copy to a
>>> corresponding or better edition of Windows Vista, but a clean install is
>>> required." Ahem.)
>>>
>>> This silly technical restriction is not required by the license
>>> agreement. It's designed to frustrate anyone who wants to use the
>>> upgrade version on a new PC without an operating system and get them to
>>> pay more for a full version. But it's easily worked around.
>>>
>>> Your easiest option - by far - is to use the PC maker's system recovery
>>> media to restore an image of Windows XP as it existed when you first got
>>> the computer, and then install Vista. I can hear the complaints now:
>>> "That copy is out of date. It's loaded with crummy, obsolete drivers and
>>> crapware." Yes, I know. That doesn't matter. Every bit of that junk will
>>> be erased soon enough. It will never get mixed with your new Vista
>>> setup.
>>>
>>> After you finish restoring that original system image, start Windows,
>>> insert the Vista DVD, and run Vista's Setup program. Follow the steps I
>>> listed in Vista Hands On #2: A no-fuss, nondestructive clean install,
>>> this time using your upgrade product key. When you're done, use the Disk
>>> Cleanup tool to remove all traces of your old installation. You have a
>>> fresh, clean system and you are in perfect compliance with your license
>>> agreement.
>>>
>>> What if you don't have a restore CD? In that case, you can install an
>>> evaluation copy of Windows Vista on the system, specifically to allow
>>> you to run Setup. Here's how:
>>>
>>> 1. Boot from the DVD and click Install Now.
>>>
>>> 2. Leave the product key box blank. Instead, click Next.
>>>
>>> 3. Click No in this warning dialog box.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 4. From the list of Vista editions, choose the one that matches the
>>> upgrade you purchased.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> 5. Complete the installation, accepting all defaults.
>>>
>>> Do whatever minimal steps are required to start your new installation
>>> for the first time. Wouldn't it be nice if you could enter your
>>> perfectly legal, fully paid-for product key now and just make the
>>> installation complete? Sorry, you can't do that.
>>>
>>> Instead, you need to run Setup again, this time from within Windows
>>> Vista. Don't choose the Upgrade option unless you want to spend an hour
>>> or two migrating your nonpersonalized default Vista settings. Instead,
>>> do a nondestructive clean install. When that's done (it should go very
>>> quickly), use the Disk Cleanup tool to blow away the redundant
>>> installation in Windows.old. You're now good to go.
>>>
>>> Now, was that a loophole? No. You satisfied every condition of the
>>> license agreement and aren't skating by on a technicality. The fact that
>>> you have to use a kludgey workaround to use the license you've purchased
>>> and are legally entitled to is Microsoft's fault.
>>>
>>>

>>

>


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  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2007
Jim
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"

"Diamontina Cocktail" <lrb@australia.com> wrote in message
news:%23FWgH%235UHHA.5108@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> It basically sounds like "install XP or W2K and then load the Vista DVD
> and tell it to clean install from there".


Even that is stupid. Why would anyone install XP first? Vista installs so
much faster than XP.


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  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2007
Leythos
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"
In article <7r7Ch.13989$B8.4780@bignews6.bellsouth.net>, asdf@cvb.com
says...
>
> "Diamontina Cocktail" <lrb@australia.com> wrote in message
> news:%23FWgH%235UHHA.5108@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> > It basically sounds like "install XP or W2K and then load the Vista DVD
> > and tell it to clean install from there".

>
> Even that is stupid. Why would anyone install XP first? Vista installs so
> much faster than XP.


No it doesn't - at least not if you don't cound all the security
updates.

I took a blank drive, installed the upgrade without using the key, then
used that install to do an inplace install with my key, it took several
hours from start to finish.


--
spam999free@rrohio.com - remove 999 to reply to me.
Using Gravity on Vista for your pleasure
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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2007
Dale
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"
Do the same thing starting with XP. It will take even longer.

Dale

"Leythos" <Void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
news:MPG.2042ceb0fa8894ff989682@adfree.usenet.com. ..
> In article <7r7Ch.13989$B8.4780@bignews6.bellsouth.net>, asdf@cvb.com
> says...
>>
>> "Diamontina Cocktail" <lrb@australia.com> wrote in message
>> news:%23FWgH%235UHHA.5108@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>> > It basically sounds like "install XP or W2K and then load the Vista DVD
>> > and tell it to clean install from there".

>>
>> Even that is stupid. Why would anyone install XP first? Vista installs
>> so
>> much faster than XP.

>
> No it doesn't - at least not if you don't cound all the security
> updates.
>
> I took a blank drive, installed the upgrade without using the key, then
> used that install to do an inplace install with my key, it took several
> hours from start to finish.
>
>
> --
> spam999free@rrohio.com - remove 999 to reply to me.
> Using Gravity on Vista for your pleasure


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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2007
Leythos
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"
In article <e$7UB18UHHA.1200@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl>, nospam@nospam.ever
says...
> Do the same thing starting with XP. It will take even longer.


Nope, I've done thousands of XP installs from scratch, on a virgin
drive, and vista takes must longer using the "Upgrade" method. I retail
install is quicker, but the upgrade method, where you install twice,
takes much longer.


--
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Using Gravity on Vista for your pleasure
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  #10 (permalink)  
Old 02-19-2007
Shane Nokes
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Facts on the "Upgrade Loophole"
That's really odd.

From the time I insert my Vista DVD until I'm at my desktop it's 15mins tops
(and that's on a worst install time case)

The second install I haven't had to do yet as I'm waiting on an upgrade copy
for my wife's PC, but knowing how fast things tend to install for me I
imagine it should take no more than an additional 20 mins.

I'll post my time once her copy arrives (hopefully it shouldn't take more
than a week)


"Leythos" <Void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
news:MPG.2043812933bbc80e989683@adfree.usenet.com. ..
> In article <e$7UB18UHHA.1200@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl>, nospam@nospam.ever
> says...
>> Do the same thing starting with XP. It will take even longer.

>
> Nope, I've done thousands of XP installs from scratch, on a virgin
> drive, and vista takes must longer using the "Upgrade" method. I retail
> install is quicker, but the upgrade method, where you install twice,
> takes much longer.
>
>
> --
> spam999free@rrohio.com - remove 999 to reply to me.
> Using Gravity on Vista for your pleasure


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