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OEM Clarification - No BS

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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-09-2007
fedway guy
 

Posts: n/a
OEM Clarification - No BS
Folks, a lot of people want to know the real scoop on the difference
between OEM and retail versions of Vista. There is a huge price
difference between the two. Here's the deal. I speak from experience
only, and I'm not associated with Microsoft except they get a lot of
money from me every year.

Prior to the release of Vista, Microsoft required the buyer to also
purchase a piece of internal hardware like a hard disk, motherboard,
or CPU to qualify for the purchase. I read where a mail order outfit
would send along some case screws, drive cables or some other useless
internal hardware crap to make the qualification.

Well, with Vista, it's no longer required. ANYONE can purchase the
OEM copy of Vista. There's only one type of OEM and that's the
complete full install disk and not an upgrade.

The only difference between the two versions (OEM vs Retail) is the
support from Micro$oft which isn't free after so many calls, and the
now pretty useless plastic box.

The OEM version comes on a DVD with very little documentation. I've
had OEM versions of other Windows versions that only came with a disk
and activation code and sticker.

Who needs those cardboard boxes with one disk inside and a few slips
of paper? DOS used to come with a complete manual of commands, etc.

When you activate any version of Vista, some hardware data from your
computer is also sent along. This is basically a fingerprint of your
machine and if that fingerprint changes to a certain level, you will
be prompted to call Bhopal India and explain yourself. All they
really want to know is why are you reinstalling Vista (I changed my
Video Card, or hard disk, etc, or had a crash), and if you are
installing it on more than one computer. THAT'S ALL FOLKS. I've
never heard of anyone being denied reactivation unless they said they
were running the software on more than one machine.

The OEM version is supposed to be installed on a computer that is
custom built by ANYONE. Dell and other manufacturers buy bulk
licenses so they can brand their restore disks with Vista. They may
or may not change some driver information pertaining to the machine
they are installing the OS on. For the most part you cannot use one
of those disks to install Vista on another computer. They were custom
made for those machines only.

So, if you go out and buy the OEM version of Vista, you will save
about fifty bucks or more. Take half of that savings and buy a GOOD
book on Vista at a bookstore. No matter what your computer expertise,
you need a good book. NOBODY knows that much about Vista that they can
use it without documentation.

Microsoft quit packaging documentation with their Operating System a
long time ago. Instead, they publish a rather thick (about 3-4") book
on it and price it at around $49.95. EVERTHING you need to know about
the Operating System is in that book, unless you are a developer and
then you probably belong to one of the expensive groups Microsoft has
for them.

BOTTOM LINE AND NO BS:
No support from Microsoft at all, period, nada, zilch.
No pretty plastic box to look at.
EVERYTHING the retail version has.
It's better to do a clean install anyway, and you get the full
version.

Now go out and buy it, use it, and come here with your support
questions. Oh, and don't forget to buy a good book. Stay away from
the Vista for Dummies book. It's only good to get you started and
doesn't explain details like privileges and permissions, something I'm
still trying to figure out.
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-09-2007
Lang Murphy
 

Posts: n/a
Re: OEM Clarification - No BS
Good post. Only comment I have that may be contrary to your post is that I
believe, and I don't think I'm alone in this, that Vista's help system is
much improved over XP's and one may actually be able to get through the
transition period with Vista help alone. If one is willing to embark on the
adventure of buying an OEM copy of Vista and doing a clean install, one
might be able to muddle through it all with Vista's online help. Jes' my two
cents. Thanks for the detailed post; appreciated.

Lang

"fedway guy" <fedwayguy@getlost.de> wrote in message
news:2j0os2dlaalk4gd2fkim4en3sm8846sfaa@4ax.com...
> Folks, a lot of people want to know the real scoop on the difference
> between OEM and retail versions of Vista. There is a huge price
> difference between the two. Here's the deal. I speak from experience
> only, and I'm not associated with Microsoft except they get a lot of
> money from me every year.
>
> Prior to the release of Vista, Microsoft required the buyer to also
> purchase a piece of internal hardware like a hard disk, motherboard,
> or CPU to qualify for the purchase. I read where a mail order outfit
> would send along some case screws, drive cables or some other useless
> internal hardware crap to make the qualification.
>
> Well, with Vista, it's no longer required. ANYONE can purchase the
> OEM copy of Vista. There's only one type of OEM and that's the
> complete full install disk and not an upgrade.
>
> The only difference between the two versions (OEM vs Retail) is the
> support from Micro$oft which isn't free after so many calls, and the
> now pretty useless plastic box.
>
> The OEM version comes on a DVD with very little documentation. I've
> had OEM versions of other Windows versions that only came with a disk
> and activation code and sticker.
>
> Who needs those cardboard boxes with one disk inside and a few slips
> of paper? DOS used to come with a complete manual of commands, etc.
>
> When you activate any version of Vista, some hardware data from your
> computer is also sent along. This is basically a fingerprint of your
> machine and if that fingerprint changes to a certain level, you will
> be prompted to call Bhopal India and explain yourself. All they
> really want to know is why are you reinstalling Vista (I changed my
> Video Card, or hard disk, etc, or had a crash), and if you are
> installing it on more than one computer. THAT'S ALL FOLKS. I've
> never heard of anyone being denied reactivation unless they said they
> were running the software on more than one machine.
>
> The OEM version is supposed to be installed on a computer that is
> custom built by ANYONE. Dell and other manufacturers buy bulk
> licenses so they can brand their restore disks with Vista. They may
> or may not change some driver information pertaining to the machine
> they are installing the OS on. For the most part you cannot use one
> of those disks to install Vista on another computer. They were custom
> made for those machines only.
>
> So, if you go out and buy the OEM version of Vista, you will save
> about fifty bucks or more. Take half of that savings and buy a GOOD
> book on Vista at a bookstore. No matter what your computer expertise,
> you need a good book. NOBODY knows that much about Vista that they can
> use it without documentation.
>
> Microsoft quit packaging documentation with their Operating System a
> long time ago. Instead, they publish a rather thick (about 3-4") book
> on it and price it at around $49.95. EVERTHING you need to know about
> the Operating System is in that book, unless you are a developer and
> then you probably belong to one of the expensive groups Microsoft has
> for them.
>
> BOTTOM LINE AND NO BS:
> No support from Microsoft at all, period, nada, zilch.
> No pretty plastic box to look at.
> EVERYTHING the retail version has.
> It's better to do a clean install anyway, and you get the full
> version.
>
> Now go out and buy it, use it, and come here with your support
> questions. Oh, and don't forget to buy a good book. Stay away from
> the Vista for Dummies book. It's only good to get you started and
> doesn't explain details like privileges and permissions, something I'm
> still trying to figure out.


Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-09-2007
Rock
 

Posts: n/a
Re: OEM Clarification - No BS
Per the license agreement an OEM copy cannot be transferred to different
computer or sold unless the sale includes the original computer on which it
was installed.

"fedway guy" <fedwayguy@getlost.de> wrote

> Folks, a lot of people want to know the real scoop on the difference
> between OEM and retail versions of Vista. There is a huge price
> difference between the two. Here's the deal. I speak from experience
> only, and I'm not associated with Microsoft except they get a lot of
> money from me every year.
>
> Prior to the release of Vista, Microsoft required the buyer to also
> purchase a piece of internal hardware like a hard disk, motherboard,
> or CPU to qualify for the purchase. I read where a mail order outfit
> would send along some case screws, drive cables or some other useless
> internal hardware crap to make the qualification.
>
> Well, with Vista, it's no longer required. ANYONE can purchase the
> OEM copy of Vista. There's only one type of OEM and that's the
> complete full install disk and not an upgrade.
>
> The only difference between the two versions (OEM vs Retail) is the
> support from Micro$oft which isn't free after so many calls, and the
> now pretty useless plastic box.
>
> The OEM version comes on a DVD with very little documentation. I've
> had OEM versions of other Windows versions that only came with a disk
> and activation code and sticker.
>
> Who needs those cardboard boxes with one disk inside and a few slips
> of paper? DOS used to come with a complete manual of commands, etc.
>
> When you activate any version of Vista, some hardware data from your
> computer is also sent along. This is basically a fingerprint of your
> machine and if that fingerprint changes to a certain level, you will
> be prompted to call Bhopal India and explain yourself. All they
> really want to know is why are you reinstalling Vista (I changed my
> Video Card, or hard disk, etc, or had a crash), and if you are
> installing it on more than one computer. THAT'S ALL FOLKS. I've
> never heard of anyone being denied reactivation unless they said they
> were running the software on more than one machine.
>
> The OEM version is supposed to be installed on a computer that is
> custom built by ANYONE. Dell and other manufacturers buy bulk
> licenses so they can brand their restore disks with Vista. They may
> or may not change some driver information pertaining to the machine
> they are installing the OS on. For the most part you cannot use one
> of those disks to install Vista on another computer. They were custom
> made for those machines only.
>
> So, if you go out and buy the OEM version of Vista, you will save
> about fifty bucks or more. Take half of that savings and buy a GOOD
> book on Vista at a bookstore. No matter what your computer expertise,
> you need a good book. NOBODY knows that much about Vista that they can
> use it without documentation.
>
> Microsoft quit packaging documentation with their Operating System a
> long time ago. Instead, they publish a rather thick (about 3-4") book
> on it and price it at around $49.95. EVERTHING you need to know about
> the Operating System is in that book, unless you are a developer and
> then you probably belong to one of the expensive groups Microsoft has
> for them.
>
> BOTTOM LINE AND NO BS:
> No support from Microsoft at all, period, nada, zilch.
> No pretty plastic box to look at.
> EVERYTHING the retail version has.
> It's better to do a clean install anyway, and you get the full
> version.
>
> Now go out and buy it, use it, and come here with your support
> questions. Oh, and don't forget to buy a good book. Stay away from
> the Vista for Dummies book. It's only good to get you started and
> doesn't explain details like privileges and permissions, something I'm
> still trying to figure out.




--
Rock [MVP - User/Shell]

Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-09-2007
fedway guy
 

Posts: n/a
Re: OEM Clarification - No BS
On Fri, 9 Feb 2007 00:49:43 -0500, "Lang Murphy"
<lang_murphy@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Good post. Only comment I have that may be contrary to your post is that I
>believe, and I don't think I'm alone in this, that Vista's help system is
>much improved over XP's and one may actually be able to get through the
>transition period with Vista help alone. If one is willing to embark on the
>adventure of buying an OEM copy of Vista and doing a clean install, one
>might be able to muddle through it all with Vista's online help. Jes' my two
>cents. Thanks for the detailed post; appreciated.
>
>Lang


My lengthy post... deleted to save space and so called bandwidth...

You may be correct. I did what I usually do when a new OS comes out.
I spent $53.00 on a VISTA book put out by.. who else but....
Microsoft. It appears to be complete and comes with a CD.

I haven't had time yet to go through it but I'm sure some answers to
questions I have are hidden in there somewhere.

I never did like software support. Unlike hardware support, the
person on the other end of the line isn't sitting in front of your
computer to see just exactly what the problem is, and depending upon
your expertise, you may not be able to explain enough detail. I
suppose you could just set up so they could access your system, but
hey, I don't trust anyone but myself on my machine.
Now hardware support is pretty straight forward and usually deals with
hard settings and drivers, and are pretty easy to fix.
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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-09-2007
fedway guy
 

Posts: n/a
Re: OEM Clarification - No BS
On Thu, 8 Feb 2007 22:17:06 -0800, "Rock" <rock@nospam.net> wrote:

>Per the license agreement an OEM copy cannot be transferred to different
>computer or sold unless the sale includes the original computer on which it
>was installed.


I gotcha, HOWEVER, what is meant by 'different computer'?? Is the
swapping out of a new hard disk, video card, CPU, considered a new
computer? I think they need to clarify what they mean by 'new
computer' before they can legally enforce the license agreement. I've
been using OEM for many many years now without any problems, but then
I've never installed it on what I would consider a new machine. I've
swapped out most everything, including the case, but some of the parts
were kept. Like a new car. If there is one used part in it, it
cannot be considered as new. Kinda like the swill Packard Bell got
caught up in a few years ago that made them go under. They were
swapping out parts from returned machines and putting them in 'new'
machines sold at retail stores. They got caught. No more Packard
Bell computers. They were a POS anyway. Doubt any are still working.

Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-09-2007
Rock
 

Posts: n/a
Re: OEM Clarification - No BS
"fedway guy" <fedwayguy@getlost.de> wrote

> On Thu, 8 Feb 2007 22:17:06 -0800, "Rock" <rock@nospam.net> wrote:
>
>>Per the license agreement an OEM copy cannot be transferred to different
>>computer or sold unless the sale includes the original computer on which
>>it
>>was installed.

>
> I gotcha, HOWEVER, what is meant by 'different computer'?? Is the
> swapping out of a new hard disk, video card, CPU, considered a new
> computer? I think they need to clarify what they mean by 'new
> computer' before they can legally enforce the license agreement. I've
> been using OEM for many many years now without any problems, but then
> I've never installed it on what I would consider a new machine. I've
> swapped out most everything, including the case, but some of the parts
> were kept. Like a new car. If there is one used part in it, it
> cannot be considered as new. Kinda like the swill Packard Bell got
> caught up in a few years ago that made them go under. They were
> swapping out parts from returned machines and putting them in 'new'
> machines sold at retail stores. They got caught. No more Packard
> Bell computers. They were a POS anyway. Doubt any are still working.



There certainly is grey area here, but some things are clear. You own a
computer, you sell it, and buy a new one. I would call that a new computer
wrt the transferability issue.

--
Rock [MVP - User/Shell]

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  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-09-2007
Donald McDaniel
 

Posts: n/a
Re: OEM Clarification - No BS
"fedway guy" <fedwayguy@getlost.de> wrote in message
news:39pps2h03a5epg84nk82vfkqm16r18b4v1@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 8 Feb 2007 22:17:06 -0800, "Rock" <rock@nospam.net> wrote:
>
>>Per the license agreement an OEM copy cannot be transferred to different
>>computer or sold unless the sale includes the original computer on which
>>it
>>was installed.

>
> I gotcha, HOWEVER, what is meant by 'different computer'?? Is the
> swapping out of a new hard disk, video card, CPU, considered a new
> computer? I think they need to clarify what they mean by 'new
> computer' before they can legally enforce the license agreement. I've
> been using OEM for many many years now without any problems, but then
> I've never installed it on what I would consider a new machine. I've
> swapped out most everything, including the case, but some of the parts
> were kept. Like a new car. If there is one used part in it, it
> cannot be considered as new. Kinda like the swill Packard Bell got
> caught up in a few years ago that made them go under. They were
> swapping out parts from returned machines and putting them in 'new'
> machines sold at retail stores. They got caught. No more Packard
> Bell computers. They were a POS anyway. Doubt any are still working.
>



"Different computer" means primarily, "NOT another one you own, and NOT one
someone else owns."

Microsoft recently clarified this, when XP SP2 was released: They believe
that bottom line definition of "new computer" (for the purposes of adding or
removing hardware from a current machine) is "an optional motherboard
replacement". (NOTE the word "optional"). I tend to agree with this.

Whether this will hold up in court or not is still to be seen.

--

Donald L McDaniel
Please reply to the original newsgroup and thread.
------------------------------------------------------

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  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2007
John C. Iliff
 

Posts: n/a
Re: OEM Clarification - No BS
Great post...one point, how about the required 'Retail Version' to purchase
up to two additional copies of Home Premium @$50 ea? That still sounds like
a good deal to me, with several 'puters, and apparently not available in
buying the OEM?

John


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  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2007
Rock
 

Posts: n/a
Re: OEM Clarification - No BS
"John C. Iliff" <joniliff@hotmail.com> wrote

> Great post...one point, how about the required 'Retail Version' to
> purchase up to two additional copies of Home Premium @$50 ea? That still
> sounds like a good deal to me, with several 'puters, and apparently not
> available in buying the OEM?


Correct. It has to be a retail, full or upgrade version for the Family
discount.

--
Rock [MVP - User/Shell]

Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2007
Angry American
 

Posts: n/a
Re: OEM Clarification - No BS
fedway guy wrote:
> Folks, a lot of people want to know the real scoop on the difference
> between OEM and retail versions of Vista. There is a huge price
> difference between the two. Here's the deal. I speak from experience
> only, and I'm not associated with Microsoft except they get a lot of
> money from me every year.
>
> Prior to the release of Vista, Microsoft required the buyer to also
> purchase a piece of internal hardware like a hard disk, motherboard,
> or CPU to qualify for the purchase. I read where a mail order outfit
> would send along some case screws, drive cables or some other useless
> internal hardware crap to make the qualification.
>
> Well, with Vista, it's no longer required. ANYONE can purchase the
> OEM copy of Vista. There's only one type of OEM and that's the
> complete full install disk and not an upgrade.
>
> The only difference between the two versions (OEM vs Retail) is the
> support from Micro$oft which isn't free after so many calls, and the
> now pretty useless plastic box.
>
> The OEM version comes on a DVD with very little documentation. I've
> had OEM versions of other Windows versions that only came with a disk
> and activation code and sticker.


Actually you can get it on CD or DVD. The DVD has all versions of the 32 bit
or 64bit OS you have purchased, and the key is what allows you to install
the version you purchased and not another version. If you purchase the 64bit
DVD then all 64 bit versions are on that DVD, but activation will only work
for the purchased version. And the OEM version comes in a plastic DVD box as
well, just not as fancy as the retail version.


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