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Is Acronis Startup Recovery compatible with Vista Startup Repair?

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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-14-2009
Tim Walters
 

Posts: n/a
Is Acronis Startup Recovery compatible with Vista Startup Repair?
My laptop is an HP Pavilion Entertainment PC and my OS is Vista Home Premium
Version 6.0 Build 6000. I haven't been able to install SP1.

I've done a mirror image of Drive C on an external HD by Acronis. Acronis
offers the option of accessing Startup Recovery (through F11) if the OS
fails to boot. Is there any danger of a conflict between this and Vista's
own startup repair system?

Second question: F8 brings up a choice of options, including a system
repair. This accesses a new menu of options, one of which is a restore from
an external source. Presumably this means a mirror image. Will ANY mirror
image work with this?

Thanks for your help.


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 10-14-2009
David B.
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Is Acronis Startup Recovery compatible with Vista Startup Repair?
This would be a question for Acronis or HP, but I suspect there would indeed
be a problem as HP also uses F11 to invoke their OEM recovery option to boot
from the OEM recovery partition, but I'm only guessing.

--


--
"Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
news:371kgl.ve7.19.1@news.alt.net...
> My laptop is an HP Pavilion Entertainment PC and my OS is Vista Home
> Premium Version 6.0 Build 6000. I haven't been able to install SP1.
>
> I've done a mirror image of Drive C on an external HD by Acronis. Acronis
> offers the option of accessing Startup Recovery (through F11) if the OS
> fails to boot. Is there any danger of a conflict between this and Vista's
> own startup repair system?
>
> Second question: F8 brings up a choice of options, including a system
> repair. This accesses a new menu of options, one of which is a restore
> from an external source. Presumably this means a mirror image. Will ANY
> mirror image work with this?
>
> Thanks for your help.
>
>


Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 10-14-2009
Richard Urban
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Is Acronis Startup Recovery compatible with Vista Startup Repair?
"Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
news:371kgl.ve7.19.1@news.alt.net...
> My laptop is an HP Pavilion Entertainment PC and my OS is Vista Home
> Premium Version 6.0 Build 6000. I haven't been able to install SP1.
>
> I've done a mirror image of Drive C on an external HD by Acronis. Acronis
> offers the option of accessing Startup Recovery (through F11) if the OS
> fails to boot. Is there any danger of a conflict between this and Vista's
> own startup repair system?
>
> Second question: F8 brings up a choice of options, including a system
> repair. This accesses a new menu of options, one of which is a restore
> from an external source. Presumably this means a mirror image. Will ANY
> mirror image work with this?
>
> Thanks for your help.
>
>




On HP computers I traditionally delete the HP recovery partition - after I
create a TrueImage image. I then expand drive C: to utilize the free space.
After this is done I install Acronis Recovery Manager, in lieu of HP's
method.

The image is created "after" I have cleansed the system of all the crap that
HP has installed. The computer is then lean and mean and ready to be imaged
as it should have been in the first place.

--

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP
Windows Desktop Experience & Security

Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 10-14-2009
Tim Walters
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Is Acronis Startup Recovery compatible with Vista Startup Repair?

"Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:uRpr$4QTKHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
> "Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
> news:371kgl.ve7.19.1@news.alt.net...
>> My laptop is an HP Pavilion Entertainment PC and my OS is Vista Home
>> Premium Version 6.0 Build 6000. I haven't been able to install SP1.
>>
>> I've done a mirror image of Drive C on an external HD by Acronis. Acronis
>> offers the option of accessing Startup Recovery (through F11) if the OS
>> fails to boot. Is there any danger of a conflict between this and Vista's
>> own startup repair system?
>>
>> Second question: F8 brings up a choice of options, including a system
>> repair. This accesses a new menu of options, one of which is a restore
>> from an external source. Presumably this means a mirror image. Will ANY
>> mirror image work with this?
>>
>> Thanks for your help.
>>
>>

>
>
>
> On HP computers I traditionally delete the HP recovery partition - after I
> create a TrueImage image. I then expand drive C: to utilize the free
> space. After this is done I install Acronis Recovery Manager, in lieu of
> HP's method.
>
> The image is created "after" I have cleansed the system of all the crap
> that HP has installed. The computer is then lean and mean and ready to be
> imaged as it should have been in the first place.



This sounds very interesting but I'm not 100% sure I follow you. Is the
order of the steps:

1. Clear out the crap;
2. Create an initial TrueImage image;
3. Delete the recovery partition;
4. Expand Drive C: to utilize the free space;
5. Reinstall Acronis Recovery Manager;
6. Make another image?

Assuming I've got this right, what exactly is the crap HP has put in?



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  #5 (permalink)  
Old 10-15-2009
Richard Urban
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Is Acronis Startup Recovery compatible with Vista Startup Repair?
"Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
news:3723qv.v26.19.1@news.alt.net...
>
> "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:uRpr$4QTKHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>> "Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
>> news:371kgl.ve7.19.1@news.alt.net...
>>> My laptop is an HP Pavilion Entertainment PC and my OS is Vista Home
>>> Premium Version 6.0 Build 6000. I haven't been able to install SP1.
>>>
>>> I've done a mirror image of Drive C on an external HD by Acronis.
>>> Acronis offers the option of accessing Startup Recovery (through F11) if
>>> the OS fails to boot. Is there any danger of a conflict between this and
>>> Vista's own startup repair system?
>>>
>>> Second question: F8 brings up a choice of options, including a system
>>> repair. This accesses a new menu of options, one of which is a restore
>>> from an external source. Presumably this means a mirror image. Will ANY
>>> mirror image work with this?
>>>
>>> Thanks for your help.
>>>
>>>

>>
>>
>>
>> On HP computers I traditionally delete the HP recovery partition - after
>> I create a TrueImage image. I then expand drive C: to utilize the free
>> space. After this is done I install Acronis Recovery Manager, in lieu of
>> HP's method.
>>
>> The image is created "after" I have cleansed the system of all the crap
>> that HP has installed. The computer is then lean and mean and ready to be
>> imaged as it should have been in the first place.

>
>
> This sounds very interesting but I'm not 100% sure I follow you. Is the
> order of the steps:
>
> 1. Clear out the crap;
> 2. Create an initial TrueImage image;
> 3. Delete the recovery partition;
> 4. Expand Drive C: to utilize the free space;
> 5. Reinstall Acronis Recovery Manager;
> 6. Make another image?
>
> Assuming I've got this right, what exactly is the crap HP has put in?
>
>
>




My steps in sequence are:

1. Image the system drive of the HP computer onto an external hard drive.
This way you can go back to "out of box" condition if needed.

2. But since out of box condition is not needed, or wanted ever again,
delete the HP system restore partition.

3. Then expand the C: partition, using the freed up and now unallocated
space from having deleted partition D:

4. Remove all of the "extra" HP supplied advertising and trial ware that
you have to pay for after 30-90 days. This includes Norton (or McAfee)
anything, Office 90 day trial, HP games, HP diagnostic programs and any
other HP utility or program that you don't want (most all of them). Most of
them are ad magnets.

5. Download and install all current operating system updates

6. Next is to install the Antivirus and Anti Malware programs of your
choice.

7. Then update Adobe Reader, Java and Adobe Flash - because a HP computer
is "always" delivered with these programs being at least 2 versions
antiquated and are therefore insecure.

8. Install TrueImage Home

9. Next is a partition defrag

10. Then create the Acronis "Secure Zone" and install the Acronis Recovery
Manager.

11. Then image the system, saving the image in the Acronis Secure Zone

NOTE: This image is as I/you want it to be, not as HP thinks it should
be. All programs have been installed/replaced and updated prior to the
image.

If you think you may ever have to rely upon HP for service it is best to
keep the image that you initially created of the hard drive as it was "out
of the box".

I have people bring me unopened computers they have just taken deliver of so
that I can provide this service for them. Yes, they pay for a retail version
of TrueImage Home and my time. The benefit is that they can return their
computer to the way it was when I returned it to them. They can also create
their own images prior to undertaking a major software install - incase
anything goes bad. If their computer becomes severely infected they can
return it to a pristine state within 10 minutes.

--

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP
Windows Desktop Experience & Security

Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 10-15-2009
Tim Walters
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Is Acronis Startup Recovery compatible with Vista Startup Repair?

"Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:O4ms0vSTKHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>
> "Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
> news:3723qv.v26.19.1@news.alt.net...
>>
>> "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:uRpr$4QTKHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>> "Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
>>> news:371kgl.ve7.19.1@news.alt.net...
>>>> My laptop is an HP Pavilion Entertainment PC and my OS is Vista Home
>>>> Premium Version 6.0 Build 6000. I haven't been able to install SP1.
>>>>
>>>> I've done a mirror image of Drive C on an external HD by Acronis.
>>>> Acronis offers the option of accessing Startup Recovery (through F11)
>>>> if the OS fails to boot. Is there any danger of a conflict between this
>>>> and Vista's own startup repair system?
>>>>
>>>> Second question: F8 brings up a choice of options, including a system
>>>> repair. This accesses a new menu of options, one of which is a restore
>>>> from an external source. Presumably this means a mirror image. Will ANY
>>>> mirror image work with this?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks for your help.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On HP computers I traditionally delete the HP recovery partition - after
>>> I create a TrueImage image. I then expand drive C: to utilize the free
>>> space. After this is done I install Acronis Recovery Manager, in lieu of
>>> HP's method.
>>>
>>> The image is created "after" I have cleansed the system of all the crap
>>> that HP has installed. The computer is then lean and mean and ready to
>>> be imaged as it should have been in the first place.

>>
>>
>> This sounds very interesting but I'm not 100% sure I follow you. Is the
>> order of the steps:
>>
>> 1. Clear out the crap;
>> 2. Create an initial TrueImage image;
>> 3. Delete the recovery partition;
>> 4. Expand Drive C: to utilize the free space;
>> 5. Reinstall Acronis Recovery Manager;
>> 6. Make another image?
>>
>> Assuming I've got this right, what exactly is the crap HP has put in?
>>
>>
>>

>
>
>
> My steps in sequence are:
>
> 1. Image the system drive of the HP computer onto an external hard
> drive. This way you can go back to "out of box" condition if needed.
>
> 2. But since out of box condition is not needed, or wanted ever again,
> delete the HP system restore partition.
>
> 3. Then expand the C: partition, using the freed up and now unallocated
> space from having deleted partition D:
>
> 4. Remove all of the "extra" HP supplied advertising and trial ware
> that you have to pay for after 30-90 days. This includes Norton (or
> McAfee) anything, Office 90 day trial, HP games, HP diagnostic programs
> and any other HP utility or program that you don't want (most all of
> them). Most of them are ad magnets.
>
> 5. Download and install all current operating system updates
>
> 6. Next is to install the Antivirus and Anti Malware programs of your
> choice.
>
> 7. Then update Adobe Reader, Java and Adobe Flash - because a HP
> computer is "always" delivered with these programs being at least 2
> versions antiquated and are therefore insecure.
>
> 8. Install TrueImage Home
>
> 9. Next is a partition defrag
>
> 10. Then create the Acronis "Secure Zone" and install the Acronis
> Recovery Manager.
>
> 11. Then image the system, saving the image in the Acronis Secure Zone
>
> NOTE: This image is as I/you want it to be, not as HP thinks it should
> be. All programs have been installed/replaced and updated prior to the
> image.
>
> If you think you may ever have to rely upon HP for service it is best to
> keep the image that you initially created of the hard drive as it was "out
> of the box".
>
> I have people bring me unopened computers they have just taken deliver of
> so that I can provide this service for them. Yes, they pay for a retail
> version of TrueImage Home and my time. The benefit is that they can return
> their computer to the way it was when I returned it to them. They can also
> create their own images prior to undertaking a major software install -
> incase anything goes bad. If their computer becomes severely infected they
> can return it to a pristine state within 10 minutes.
>


One impoirtant question I forgot to ask: will my existing Office and
WordPerfect installations survive the process, or will I have to reinstall?




Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 10-15-2009
Richard Urban
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Is Acronis Startup Recovery compatible with Vista Startup Repair?
"Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
news:373eiu.964.17.1@news.alt.net...
>
> "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:O4ms0vSTKHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>
>> "Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
>> news:3723qv.v26.19.1@news.alt.net...
>>>
>>> "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:uRpr$4QTKHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>>>> "Tim Walters" <timwalters@DROPTHISterra.es> wrote in message
>>>> news:371kgl.ve7.19.1@news.alt.net...
>>>>> My laptop is an HP Pavilion Entertainment PC and my OS is Vista Home
>>>>> Premium Version 6.0 Build 6000. I haven't been able to install SP1.
>>>>>
>>>>> I've done a mirror image of Drive C on an external HD by Acronis.
>>>>> Acronis offers the option of accessing Startup Recovery (through F11)
>>>>> if the OS fails to boot. Is there any danger of a conflict between
>>>>> this and Vista's own startup repair system?
>>>>>
>>>>> Second question: F8 brings up a choice of options, including a system
>>>>> repair. This accesses a new menu of options, one of which is a restore
>>>>> from an external source. Presumably this means a mirror image. Will
>>>>> ANY mirror image work with this?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks for your help.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On HP computers I traditionally delete the HP recovery partition -
>>>> after I create a TrueImage image. I then expand drive C: to utilize the
>>>> free space. After this is done I install Acronis Recovery Manager, in
>>>> lieu of HP's method.
>>>>
>>>> The image is created "after" I have cleansed the system of all the crap
>>>> that HP has installed. The computer is then lean and mean and ready to
>>>> be imaged as it should have been in the first place.
>>>
>>>
>>> This sounds very interesting but I'm not 100% sure I follow you. Is the
>>> order of the steps:
>>>
>>> 1. Clear out the crap;
>>> 2. Create an initial TrueImage image;
>>> 3. Delete the recovery partition;
>>> 4. Expand Drive C: to utilize the free space;
>>> 5. Reinstall Acronis Recovery Manager;
>>> 6. Make another image?
>>>
>>> Assuming I've got this right, what exactly is the crap HP has put in?
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>>
>>
>> My steps in sequence are:
>>
>> 1. Image the system drive of the HP computer onto an external hard
>> drive. This way you can go back to "out of box" condition if needed.
>>
>> 2. But since out of box condition is not needed, or wanted ever again,
>> delete the HP system restore partition.
>>
>> 3. Then expand the C: partition, using the freed up and now
>> unallocated space from having deleted partition D:
>>
>> 4. Remove all of the "extra" HP supplied advertising and trial ware
>> that you have to pay for after 30-90 days. This includes Norton (or
>> McAfee) anything, Office 90 day trial, HP games, HP diagnostic programs
>> and any other HP utility or program that you don't want (most all of
>> them). Most of them are ad magnets.
>>
>> 5. Download and install all current operating system updates
>>
>> 6. Next is to install the Antivirus and Anti Malware programs of your
>> choice.
>>
>> 7. Then update Adobe Reader, Java and Adobe Flash - because a HP
>> computer is "always" delivered with these programs being at least 2
>> versions antiquated and are therefore insecure.
>>
>> 8. Install TrueImage Home
>>
>> 9. Next is a partition defrag
>>
>> 10. Then create the Acronis "Secure Zone" and install the Acronis
>> Recovery Manager.
>>
>> 11. Then image the system, saving the image in the Acronis Secure Zone
>>
>> NOTE: This image is as I/you want it to be, not as HP thinks it should
>> be. All programs have been installed/replaced and updated prior to the
>> image.
>>
>> If you think you may ever have to rely upon HP for service it is best to
>> keep the image that you initially created of the hard drive as it was
>> "out of the box".
>>
>> I have people bring me unopened computers they have just taken deliver of
>> so that I can provide this service for them. Yes, they pay for a retail
>> version of TrueImage Home and my time. The benefit is that they can
>> return their computer to the way it was when I returned it to them. They
>> can also create their own images prior to undertaking a major software
>> install - incase anything goes bad. If their computer becomes severely
>> infected they can return it to a pristine state within 10 minutes.
>>

>
> One impoirtant question I forgot to ask: will my existing Office and
> WordPerfect installations survive the process, or will I have to
> reinstall?
>
>
>
>




If you have these programs on the system drive, usually drive C, yes.

An image is a photograph of your system at a given time. If you have already
activated the O/S and Office when you create the image - they will be in an
activated state when you restore said image.

--

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP
Windows Desktop Experience & Security

Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 10-15-2009
Tim Walters
 

Posts: n/a
Re: Is Acronis Startup Recovery compatible with Vista Startup Repair?

"David B." <mail@nomail.net> wrote in message
news:ucYfzWPTKHA.3540@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>
> This would be a question for Acronis or HP, but I suspect there would
> indeed be a problem as HP also uses F11 to invoke their OEM recovery
> option to boot from the OEM recovery partition, but I'm only guessing.
>


You guessed right. But Acronis (supposedly) allows changes to be made to the
setup. The procedure is to select the F11 button, then edit a particular
file in order to change F11 to F12. Unfortunately, after editing the
relevant file, when I try to save it, I get the message: "You don't have
permission to save in this location. Contact the administrator."

I am the administrator.

The file has the extension .cfg and I was trying to edit with Notepad.

How can I save my edited version? In fact, how can I give myself full
authority to change whatever I want?


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